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Brain Feels Rewarded While Looking at Art

Brain Feels Rewarded While Looking at Art psychcentral.com Take a look at an interesting article we found.

Exhibit shows 30 years of copying Monet

Exhibit shows 30 years of copying Monet pvnews.com Take a look at an interesting article we found.

A Monet arrival creates a Monet revival

A Monet arrival creates a Monet revival oregonlive.com Take a look at an interesting article we found.

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Well, maybe not directly.

But the name of the movement comes from the title of Claude Monet's work, Impression, Sunrise, a painting that so provoked critic Louis Leroy that this was his reply:

"Impression I was certain of it. I was just telling myself that, since I was impressed, there had to be some impression in it — and what freedom, what ease of workmanship! A preliminary drawing for a wallpaper pattern is more finished than this seascape."

If only we had access to that wallpaper.

Now it appears that the city that once ridiculed his art is rediscovering Claude Monet, who could have made it easier on his critics if they had only listened:

"Everyone discusses my art and pretends to understand, as if it were necessary to understand, when it is simply necessary to love."

And some 83,000 people have already found his art is indeed lovable at two exhibitions in Paris this season, at the Grand Palais.

Seventy museums around the world contributed over 200 paintings making it by far the largest retrospective of his works in France in over 30 years.

Another critic, Jonathan Jones of the Guardian, who has the perspective of time, says, "Monet haunts his dreams."

Specifically his Bathers at La Grenouillère, painted in 1869.

Stare at it long enough and it might haunt your dreams too.

One of Monet's greatest achievements is the house he rented in May 1883, at Giverny, on two acres, which he later bought.

There was a barn that doubled as a painting studio, and a "small" garden.

Monet had many architects for his garden, but it was essentially his own creation.

He called it, "his masterpiece."

"It took me time to understand my waterlillies. I had planted them for the pleasure of it; I grew them without ever thinking of painting them."

We can all be glad he changed his mind.

Monet was an artist in everything he did; if you can find the out of print "Monet's Table, The Cooking Journals of Claude Monet," you'll see how his passions translated to other talents.

The great artists make you see and feel things differently.

Monet was one the artists of that period who showed us the light.

J. Peterman

 

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Under Construction: Design Stuff & Member Commenting - Changes Soon.
53 Members’ Opinions
January 13, 2011 6:19 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1 bebe said...

Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhh........................snow days gone.......................it's back to school. I was so getting used to being a lady of leisure.....................my life was one big IMPRESSIONIST painting...................I stayed on topic.................bwaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahahahahaha.....................................

January 13, 2011 7:37 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

Ahhhhh...... The Bad Lads. What a huge impression the Impressionists made on me as a young art student. Despite much wailing & gnashing of teeth from the critics, they broke convention and generated an exciting explosion of colour, freedom & fun. The "hippies" of their day. It's probably Monet's fault that I have a large pond with water lilies in my garden and when I contemplate them, I think of those lovely Degas ballerinas. Who sees a sunflower or crows flying over a cornfield without thinking of Van Gogh? The days I spent with a rumbling tummy as the choice was food/art galleries. Worth every minute.

more on the honor roll
January 13, 2011 7:50 AM
Atticus_1 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Bert said...

Bebe: "Lady of Leisure" has me sitting here with a naughty grin on my face.....lol

Hazel: Nice post (as always), today I will let those of you with more talent than me be the teachers, and I will be the student. I love but do not understand the subtle nuiances of impressionism, so I try to remain in an area of personal comfort that is easier. Edward Hopper & American realism is my thing, OR a fond revisiting of my sainted mother's secret stash of my childhood ventures into artistic creativity: stick people (lol)...

January 13, 2011 8:38 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

Bert~ Lowry, English painter, has a whole new gallery dedicated to him. He is famous for his stick people paintings. Impressionist is not hard to understand, the people who did it were not intellectual giants or anything. 
I have a half-baked theory that modern painters have a form of OCD that they release through their art & their work resonates with people who want a picture on their wall to drift off into. Like a comfort blanket for adults. This thought is simmering on the back burner.

January 13, 2011 8:55 AM
Tommy_avatar 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Thomas Typicalis said...

Colour is so enhanced by natural light of the outdoors and the eye of the beholder and the impression that one gets and its personal importance was a continuation of the freedom that humankind had not experienced until the 19th century and continues today. I think of how this led to the post-impressionists of which Gauguin is my favorite and then to the Lost Generation of Americans hanging out in Paris with Gertrude Stein and Hemingway; the literature and poetry that influenced me as a boy, I am colorfully reminded how the French have such an integral part of a small town boy's perspective of things. I shall listen to Erik Satie and may wear my beret today though embracing their politics is out of the question. Vive Claude!

January 13, 2011 10:12 AM
10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Stoney said...


Ah, light, that's right- but without shadow, it is meaningless.
Spin a laterally-lit (boiled) egg on a table and ask a child to pick a favorite side.
The demarcation line between light and dark will be more distinct from the bright side.

Willie ~
The leggy woman in shorts was particularly enjoyable. As for the rest... I have forgotten what it was but thank you!

As for Monet, most of the clunky the boats in his, Bathers at La Grenouillère, lack, in just the slightest way, the smooth and graceful arcing gunnels that steam-bent wood would have created leaving a bad impression.

January 13, 2011 10:32 AM
Tommy_avatar 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Thomas Typicalis said...

Stoney, et al- When I taught a Sunday School Class, I often spoke of the need to understand the role and necessity of darkness in the development of one's spiritual perspective as well as one's view of the natural world. C.S. Lewis said that nothing is simple. I have often felt that the great artists and thinkers take the extremely complex and give it a certain ease that does not in reality exist in the complexity of all things. We enjoy it like a repast, a meal which is in effect a restful prayer for the sustaining of life which is why cooking and food/wine is for me such an enjoyable experience and akin to art as the article suggests. I love getting dressed for dinner or a visit to the Frist Museum as both suggest a celebration of the finer things and it makes you feel good.

January 13, 2011 10:35 AM
1046 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Willie Trask said...

STONEY, He coulda been a conten.. He could have been Secretary of Ag for SC, an elected position, but he came in second in a 2 person race.  His slogan was good, though: PUT THE STATE ON YOUR PLATE...

January 13, 2011 11:09 AM
Me_and_dave 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Andy said...

Wilie - enjoyed it; looked like some of my husband's relatives (whoops, did I say that out loud?)

January 13, 2011 11:13 AM
Me_and_dave 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Andy said...

I'm with Bert on this one -- while I love art and can appreciate the beauty, I know nothing about it and will wait, once again, until we get to food.  I thought we would be there by now since Mr. P mentioned  "Monet's Table, The Cooking Journals of Claude Monet".  As a gift one year, from someone who knew how I loved both cookbooks and art books, I received a tour of Italy -- a cook/art book that's just gorgeous.  But again, I can only appreciate -- but we need people like us or where would the great artists be?

January 13, 2011 11:50 AM
10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Mooseloop said...

Willie T -- What an odd juxtaposition of hogs and tango! I like the man, Emile, and his free spirit approach to pig farming! Thanks for sharing that bit of agrarian art, as it reminded me of my granddaddy's farm and the fat hogs that enjoy just such freedom to wallow and root before going off to become pork chops!
 
(I remember riding with him in his old Dodge truck to collect barrels of"swill" [discarded food scraps] from several restaurants in Gainesville, FL to feed to the pigs. Of course, the health dept. would not allow such unregulated disposal of raw food scraps today, but at that time (1952) the pigs seemed happy to get it. (Actually, Emile did mention receiving food scraps, so maybe the rules have not changed so much in SC.) Wonder what the rules are about that?
 
And that video of Riding the Pigs to Glory relates to Monet in what way? I am grasping for a connection. Is it the outdoor atmosphere, the natural lounging, or the vegetation?
 
As I write, looking out the window on my right at 4 days' accumulated snow, iced over, and wondering if I have courage to go out, I look to my left and again admire a print of Monet's "Waterlillies-1908" which I had framed in gold  (when I could not afford such frames) and which has been on my wall since I first set up my first apartment as a newlywed in 1966. Along the bottom of the print these words: "Let everything about you breathe the calm and peace of the soul."  Yes, good art has power to touch the mind and give a happy jolt to the inner being. Thanks JP for today's topic.

January 13, 2011 11:51 AM
Photo 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Peter Lake said...

all that is missing from great paintings, especially those magnificent impressions of nature; are the scents, sounds, smells and touch..... all of those things that bring it to life and exist in the momement and make it so precious... As much as I admire the artist.... I'd rather be surrounded by the scene and really awake in the moment. Its all good

January 13, 2011 12:03 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

Willie Trask~ We are supposed to be talking Impressionist, not Surrealist. What does hot to trot pork have to do with it? And should it be served with Salsa? Loved the red shoes. I'm off to the butcher to get one of those pork chops with kidney in & frazzle it in a hot oven with small potatos and a big cooking apple. Then something green .... maybe winter cabbage from the garden.
Yr man who coulda been ..... don't say that, he IS a great pigfarmer, treats his animals right.

January 13, 2011 1:02 PM
Com-100First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 jmr said...

Monet never got his due. As a matter of fact I have "Manet's Table." It's a wonderful book. I wish I was able to see the show in Paris, but then again I wish I was in Paris a lot.

January 13, 2011 1:35 PM
1-dscn1106-4 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 PARK4 said...

Hazel:  a pond in Wales, a la Monet, with waterlillies.  who knew, but how lovely.  Can we have a photo of it?

January 13, 2011 2:08 PM
1046 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Willie Trask said...

Maybe Monet ate pork chops...Perhaps he tangoed.   ...   JMR, I find it hard to imagine how much more of his due Monet could get.  I do not know about his lifetime, but anything more now would require a religion, or perhaps digging him up and taking him to Oslo for  the Peace Prize.

January 13, 2011 2:11 PM
1046 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Willie Trask said...

Peter Lake,  That young fictitious master Calvin once made a school safety poster with spaghetti sauce mixed into the red so that the bloody scene would attract real flies.     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calvin_and_Hobbes

January 13, 2011 2:12 PM
10photoviewsCom-100Com-300First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 rwh1 said...

This past nov. my wife and I went to SanFransisco to celebrate our 45 anniversay and we noticed the hill s have gotten steeper over the years. While we were there the DeYoung Art Gallery in Golden Gate Park was having an exibition of works of French artists that was on loan from France. Included were many pieces from Monet, Manet, Cezanne, Gauguin, Lautrec, Van Gogh and several others. It was a very good display of the type of art being discussed today.Hey, those guys and gals were GOOD.
It was a great way to spend a cool autumn day.

January 13, 2011 2:20 PM
10photoviewsCom-100Com-300First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 rwh1 said...

Sorry - it is the de Young Museum not gallery

January 13, 2011 2:20 PM
Photo 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Peter Lake said...

Don't get me wrong about paintings and painters....I have often woolgathered about being one of those seemingly very content souls as they sit in front of their easels on some beautiful shoreline capturing the the colours, lights and shadows as the image flows in through their senses and are then translated onto a once blank canvas for their pleasure, or to share it with others who may appreciate their efforts.

Me, .... Well I can paint walls, ceilings and porches....as well as whatever I may be wearing at the time.

Speaking of gardens, I just found out that mine will be attacked by a heavy duty digger to repair a broken sewer pipe. I know what I will be doing this spring. Good thing I got a new knee installed this past year..... It'll be just fine.... The snow will cover up the scars until I can get to them.

January 13, 2011 2:25 PM
Stage_2 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 JALOPKIN said...

I appreciate all of the Impressionists, and their Artistic Take, on Life ... I probably favor Renoir a little more than the others, because of the subtlty of his expression, which helps me to remember that, however vividly shiny that Silver Lining might it, it always has has a cloud with it ...  I am more a Fan of the Heavy Weight Masters, Titian and Rubens in particular, and as Abstractionists go, I much prefer Modigliani ....... Impressionism is just marvelous ... but I like my Art the way I like my women ... with a little more substance ...

January 13, 2011 2:54 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

PARK4~ I don't do photos, but I can make you a word picture. Big pond in a woodland garden. Sited so it is not overhung by trees but can reflect their splendour. Parts of the margins of the pond are planted with large architectural plants, the most spectacular being Gunnera, whose leaves span over six feet. Big clumps of New Zealand flaxes, huge, strappy leaved things, some variegated green and yellow, some purple and crimson. Assorted bamboos. Wild Iris. Then I have a pebble beach-y bit so the amphibians can get in & out easily. It's planted with Alchimila Mollis that keeps a raindrop in the centre of its leaf that looks like a pearl. In the shallow margins of the pond, toadflax, bog-bean, water forget-me-not, very expensive specialist water plants .... and in the deeper water part of the pond, waterlilies, bulrushes. In the water, depending on the time of year, creatures. Over the water, dragonflies.

January 13, 2011 2:58 PM
Paolo 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 paolos said...

Another impression of sunrise.  I can even tie it
into Willie's video.  The (another) Dee Felice trio with James Brown (South
Carolina) and Marva Whitney performs Sunny...
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SzSkypAIRzM
 
 
As Socrates said to Phaedrus, The painter's products stand before us as
though they were alive, but if you question them, they maintain a most majestic
silence.

 
If you question a recording, it just says the same thing over and over
again.
 
It's just like Claude says, You don't have to understand it, but you
gotta love it.

 
Or better yet in the French words of the Scot poet, Ian Hamilton
Finley

La vie, la vie


Beaucoup de parapluies


translated by the poet as


Oh life, what a lot of


umbrellas.

January 13, 2011 3:27 PM
Photo 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Peter Lake said...

Willie Trask..... only the true Master's can overcome the otherwise seemingly insurmountable barriers that typically prevent paintings from achieving other dimesions..... I miss Calvin & Hobbs.  Enlightened philosophers ahead of their time.

January 13, 2011 4:14 PM
Paolo 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 paolos said...

Ivan,
 
I just saw three Titians upclose last week
at the Atlanta High Museum of Art.  The exhibit just
closed.

Diana and Acteon, Diana and Callisto, Venus
Anadyomene.  He certainly knew how to use his brush and
oils.

 
Titian, he uplifts the honor of his
name.

January 13, 2011 4:27 PM
10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Stoney said...


hazel ~

You don't need no stinkin' pitchers.
Although Seamus Heaney or Roald Dahl might have expanded a bit on what was taking place between the beats of dragonfly wings and on the undersides of the lily pads.

As kids, we took the warning against messing with the water lilies so to heart that when someone in our boat did it, we threw him overboard. He could not, as it turned out, swim but he could walk to the far shore of the lagoon and spend the rest of the summer dodging our taunts.

Peter Lake ~
There are stout young men with strong arms and backs and knees made out of bone who enjoy moving earth around for an ounce or two of gold.

January 13, 2011 4:42 PM
Stage_2 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 JALOPKIN said...

PAOLOS:  Most definitely, Sir !!!   He had a talent for putting so much life into his works that one can fairly taste everything in the scene, and smell the tarnish on Brass Buttons ... Drama, in Oils and Earth Salts ... Titian probably defined Barroque .......

January 13, 2011 4:48 PM
Stage_2 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 JALOPKIN said...

ANDY:   You're doin' jes fine ...  And give this enough times and it'll get around to Food too ...
 
It is not necessary for one to be a Long-Studied Expert on Art, to know what he likes and what he doesn't, and be able to make any Comment he so desires about it ....... We all care what you FEEL ... not what your Pedigree says .......

January 13, 2011 5:15 PM
Paolo 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 paolos said...

For a Christmas gift to a friend, I commissioned a local artist to
paint an impression of Beethoven.
Steve Penley is a native of Chattanooga and makes
his home in west Georgia.
 
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TF9xEsJ58QE
 
I posted a photo of the result for anyone
interested.
 
http://www.petermanseye.com/photos/294481

January 13, 2011 5:20 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-5 George Hall said...

Boston Museum of Fine Art has a portrait of Monet's wife "Camille Monet in Japanese Costume". Beautiful but to my mind very non-Monet-ish.If you are in the Boston area its worth visiting.
 
This is a I know just enough about to be dangerous...but I suspect a bunch. Is LeRoy Neiman modern day Impreesioist? I love his splashes of reds, greens, yellows...reminds me of a Peterman's skirt commercial...you know 'you think you saw something then you didn't but you know you will if nothing more than a flash if you just keep looking'.
 
 

January 13, 2011 5:35 PM
1046 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Willie Trask said...

thanks, Paolos.  very nice indeed.

January 13, 2011 5:47 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-5 George Hall said...

Paolos, you run deep, man!!! and that's a good thing!

January 13, 2011 5:49 PM
1-dscn1106-4 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 PARK4 said...

Well, Hazel you should do pitchers, because I bet they'd be amazing. 

January 13, 2011 6:00 PM
Poison_dart_frog_2 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1 Miss Blue said...

Monet did understand the water lilies.


Their roots draw nourishment from the mucky bottom as their leaves, landing pads for dragonflies and faeries, float on still reflective waters. When exposed to enough sun and warmth, they offer their best blooms and heady breath. In the cold of winter, even the hardy varieties recoil from Boreas' hand, to lay dormant, waiting for spring.


Their tubers provide tasty snacks for turtles and ducks and fry seek refuge in the rafts of leaves that frame their hidden world.


But,Nymphaeaceae will quickly choke placid waters with unwanted numbers if left unchecked, by blocking the stirring and mixing offered by the wind, accelerating the death of the aquatic system.


It's said that Monet's water garden had but one function, to be beautiful.


 


H.L.


I am envious of your Gunnera. Does it winter over, or do you offer it refuge in the greenhouse?


.

January 13, 2011 6:21 PM
Paolo 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 paolos said...

George ~ Sometimes it gets so deep I need to pick up a pair of swamp walkers.

January 13, 2011 6:39 PM
1-dscn1106-4 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 PARK4 said...

I was going to ask the same or similar question, Miss Blue.  Our winters are hard on such plants...Hazel how do you protect them?  Do you really have a greenhouse, or a garden room?  I think garden rooms are lovely:  my mother in law has one built onto ever house she buys, except this last one which is just overflowing with plants willy nilly.  Spill it Hazel:  have you a greenhouse?  Curious gardeners want to know!

January 13, 2011 7:11 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

Miss Blue~ The gunnera, when the weather is turning cold, I have to grit my teeth and cut the stems to use the leaves to make an insulating shelter for the 'crowns' - they are much too big to come into the greenhouse!!!! In spring, the new leaves will punch their way through the protective layer of last years leaves looking like a closed fist that gradually becomes an open hand. The speed of growth is phenomenal - over the spring-summer they make 10-12 feet high with leaves 6-8feet wide. Kids who visit are facinated by them - a little boy remarked, on feeling the bristly texture of a gunnera leaf, that it feels like daddy when he needs a shave. On a warm day in June, if I stand quiet by the pond, I can hear the gunnera growing, it makes creaky, squeaky sounds. If, on such a day, you cut one of the stems, it pumps water like an arterial bleed. Do you have waterlillies? When they die back to go to sleep for the winter, the previous years growth is disgustingly slimy and snotty. Not a pleasant task to clean up. I forgot when I was describing my pond to say about the little creatures, bugs that dive using a bubble of air, bugs that can walk on water - birds, robins can stand on a lilly leaf to take bugs, families of blue tits and blackbirds come to the pebbly edge to have a good bath, a heron who is not very welcome, zillions of tadpoles and baby newts and the fish. They lurk in the bottom of the pond all winter, when the water warms up they will be up, begging for food.

January 13, 2011 7:19 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

While I was blithering .... young gunnera may need a half bale of straw, bubble wrap, something.

January 13, 2011 7:21 PM
Tommy_avatar 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Thomas Typicalis said...

I did a cigar commercial today and I betrayed Mr. P by wearing a powder blue Tommy Bahama Aruba zip. To the topic Color is such a mood setter for me. In the end I like abstracts the best and the use of everyday products as art pieces. I have a surfboard that was hand painted by an artist on the Redneck Riviera in LA. (That's Lower Alabama). I value that as much as I do my Lauri Zeszut I bought when I was so broke but it hit me and $2500 at that time was my whole fortune. Check out her work. It is awesome if you are not familiar. http://www.zeszut.com/ I have some signed Markus Pierson works as well that I bought so long ago as I am a huge Joni Mitchell fan and he used coyotes in whimsical situations. I guess I am referring to Hazel's comment about art over eating sometimes. Again the risk of something that lasts as a memory or as something tangible. Do a little of both perhaps. As Bond would say you only live twice.   

January 13, 2011 7:42 PM
Paolo 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 paolos said...

I probably have one of these for every occasion and if y’all
get tired of seeing them, just let me know and I'll stop.

One of my favorite pastimes is ekphrasis or telling the
story that I see in a painting or other work of art.

I did a series on several works by Monet and this is one
from the archives that almost seems on topic. 
I hope it doesn’t spill down the page like a big ol’ ink spot.

 

The Seine at Chatou near Argenteuil

 

In
time with the clouds

the
sailboat glides downriver

and
for a brief moment, hesitates

so
that from the shoreline

the
bearded old codger

can
quickly sketch her into his painting.

 

Her
gratuitous pose is neither vain

nor
narcissistic (she rarely glances

at
her own reflection in the waters).

It is
both an acknowledgment

of
her love for the skill

of
this particular artist’s hands

and a
tribute to his vivid perception

and
cogent brushstrokes.

 

She
knows that in time

only they
will remember the detail

and
only they can account

for
the impression she has made.

January 13, 2011 7:45 PM
Paolo 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 paolos said...

Sorry, the draft was more compact, this gives me two lines for the price of one.  If I knew how to fix it, I would. 

January 13, 2011 7:50 PM
Poison_dart_frog_2 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1 Miss Blue said...

 
 
 
 
formatting here, is tricky at times.
 
 
paolos, lovely.
 

January 13, 2011 8:48 PM
Stage_2 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 JALOPKIN said...

PAOLOS:  Excellent Rendering !!!  Displays the rage he felt because of his hearing loss(which didn't really seem to slow him down any ...) with what looks to me like a mix of Noah Beery and a touch of Leon Askin .......  Great Painting ... A Talented Fellow, your friend Mr. Penley ...  Thanks for sharing it with us .......
 
TOMMY:  I hope at least that it was a decent Cigar ... No Paper, No Perfume .......

January 13, 2011 8:51 PM
Stage_2 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 JALOPKIN said...

PARK4:   Some Painters like Pitchers ... Some Painters like Jugs ... Is that what ewer tryin' to say ???

January 13, 2011 8:54 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1 bebe said...

PAOLOS....................really beautiful.................
 
TT..........a day I had.......I could do w/ one of your cigars about now..................
 
IVAN................you're just bad & very funny!
 
BERT..................top off those feeders; NOW!

January 13, 2011 9:13 PM
Stage_2 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 JALOPKIN said...

But Bebe !!!  I wuz only tryin' t' hep out some .......
 
Didja read the blurb I left yesterday about the Cocoa Amore ???  The Site I mentioned is a Good one to be aware of, and get onto their Newsletter ...

January 13, 2011 10:00 PM
Photo 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Peter Lake said...

Paolos- what an enjoyable read.. Nicely done.

Ivan..... You always provide a daily highlight and I do appreciate it.

Me....well I've got a sudden hankerin' for some cinnamon Belgium waffles....peace out

January 13, 2011 10:07 PM
10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Stoney said...


paolos ~

Nice work formatting notwithstanding.
I use it only for things like: "Really?!"

January 13, 2011 10:09 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-5 George Hall said...

Jalopkin, your willingness to pitch in and hep out is duly noted and always appreciated, savored and admired!

January 13, 2011 11:00 PM
Paolo 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 paolos said...


Thank you all for the accolades.

 

Ivan, I liked Gary
Oldman’s portrayal of Ludwig in Immortal
Beloved
.

The Emperor Concerto
#5 is one of my favorite piano compositions. 
It makes me wanna dance.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XttTpZHQgJw

 

January 13, 2011 11:37 PM
10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Stoney said...


It came up today, twice, and set me to thinking... that phrase: "BUT, his/her heart is/was in the right place," seems always to refer to persons about whom there is/was very little doubt that it is/was not.

paolos ~
Call:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iwXljRJNN74

but not raise.


Prime Web

Restoring Monet's house and garden

Restoring Monet's house and garden giverny.org Take a look at an interesting article we found.

French Impressionism

French Impressionism lilithgallery.com Take a look at an interesting article we found.

The Art of Claude Monet

The Art of Claude Monet artcyclopedia.com Take a look at an interesting article we found.

Honor Roll


Ahhhhh...... The Bad Lads. What a huge impression the Impressionists made on me as a young art st...

-hazel leese

Jan. 13, 2011 7:37 AM

read full opinion



Poll

Who's your favorite impressionist?

  • Van Gogh Van Gogh 22%
  • Monet Monet 38%
  • Degas Degas 13%
  • Cezanne Cezanne 0%
  • Renoir Renoir 13%
  • Manet Manet 3%
  • You impress us You impress us 13%

Yesterday's Discussion

Bittersweet chocolate is a guilt free indulgence since it's good for you.

 

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