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We like to think of Peterman’s Eye as an old fashioned interactive community newspaper (if there is such a thing) focused on travel and curiosities. Talk with us about today’s post. Tell us about the places you’ve been. Or take a trip using J. Peterman’s exclusive travel services (coming soon). Read more...



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Purer than its fourth cousin, the Philly cheesesteak.

More comforting than a roast beef hoagie.

The Baltimore Pit Beef Sandwich is, well, complicated.

Certainly more American than the hamburger, from Hamburg?

The frankfurter from...Frankfurt?

This candidate doesn't need any further ingredients other than the perfect baguette, thinly sliced roast beef, and au jus from the cooking process.

Which is how the sandwich was first created at either of these two restaurants in Los Angeles:

Cole's Pacific Electric Buffet or Philippe The Original.

The debate still rages.

But we do know at both of these restaurants, established in 1908, the roll is dipped into the hot beef juices before the sandwich is assembled, and the sandwich is served "wet."

The sandwich can also be requested to be served "double dipped" at either establishment.

Although single dippers might look askance.

If you can't make it to either establishment, you can make it at home.

Today you can "enhance" the dip with beef broth, consomme or a touch of Worcestershire Sauce.

Some blasphemous recipes call for onion soup.

The French dip.

America’s sandwich?

Undergoing a bit of a Renaissance these days.

After all, the Statue of Liberty came from France.

And it doesn't really require a French baguette.

As worthy a contender as any.

You got a beef?

J. Peterman

 

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Under Construction: Design Stuff & Member Commenting - Changes Soon.
76 Members’ Opinions
January 04, 2012 12:07 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 lotlot said...

Wow! Love that sandwich.

Thought I was full until I saw that picture at the top.

Now I don't know if I can make it until breakfast.

January 04, 2012 12:09 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 lotlot said...

Also like the open-faced roast beef sandwich.

With plenty of mashed potatoes, of course.

January 04, 2012 12:23 AM
4224 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 RoadYacht said...

What!!! Al's #1 Beef in Chicago isn't even listed?!? A travesty! Soon to be investigated by someone, I am sure!

January 04, 2012 12:28 AM
Sarah2 10photoviewsFirst-comFirst-photoHr-1 Dash said...

The Fourth Earl of Sandwich, God bless his soul, is responsible for the idea of the sandwich, as well as the naming of the Sandwich Islands.  His decendant, the Eleventh Earl of Sandwich, is now apparently attempting to make a bit of cash out of his forefather's brilliant idea by openning sandwich shops  in England to help with the upkeep of the family estate.  Or so I read.  So the sandwich is a thoroughly Engllish idea but whole-heartedly American.  And the simpler the better, as the Earl might agree.  The Fourth Earl that is.  Fresh bread and some perfect filling like tender beef would be just the ticket to take in one had while gathering reins in the other as you readied yourself to ride to hounds in the English countryside in the 17th century.  I can't think of a more perfect lunch.

January 04, 2012 12:35 AM
4224 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 RoadYacht said...

OOPS!.....THAT should be Pastys....(the former would  be the cover of the liquid lunch provider/er (hostess?  help me here)I am at a loss...and there are still cookies...and Floyd is hovering.....

January 04, 2012 1:32 AM
1014 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 karma swim swami said...

Roadie: no need to be corny or Cornish.

And anyway, the caucus has absconded with my appetite.

January 04, 2012 1:57 AM
Sarah2 10photoviewsFirst-comFirst-photoHr-1 Dash said...

RY:  Those little folded over pastry sandwiches, not the tassles on the waitresses bosoms, correct??

January 04, 2012 1:59 AM
Sarah2 10photoviewsFirst-comFirst-photoHr-1 Dash said...

And where did you get all those cookies???

January 04, 2012 3:02 AM
1014 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 karma swim swami said...

Roadie just went all Benny Hill for a moment. You know, as in, "I'd like to see HER in 3-D. That's my apartment!"

If you drop the ambiguous "past--- sandwich" in front of me, my brain fills in the blanks with "pastrami." I don't think Pastrami is one of the Sandwich Islands, but it could be.

January 04, 2012 5:38 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Julia Masi said...

Why hasn't anyone written a sandwhich  recipe book?  I realize that you don't have to actually cook to make a sandwhich but littles things like horseradish on pastrami or salsa or pesto sauce on cheese sandwhich can make a big difference between two ordinary slices of bread. 

January 04, 2012 6:31 AM
Myself 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Spring Fragrance said...

Good morning Julia!! I was just thinking sandwiches are the original "fast food". It plays a little like Ground Hog day but the guy from the office next door often sees me preparing a sandwich for breakfast in our common utility kitchen. He will always say I have the most western breakfast and I will say, " but C****, it is the fastest breakfast I can prepare"

January 04, 2012 7:17 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

Sandwiches were the original 'Eat on the Hoof' food, which gave rise to the unattractive trend for people to walk down the street stuffing their faces. My parents generation frowned on this, considering it to be vulgar and common. As a child, I was made to sit at the table to eat anything and came to notice that our house did not have a dado rail of tomato sauce child size handprints and other mysterious markings on the lower parts of the wall. My mother kept a damp cloth and little ones did not escape from the table 'till their hands had been cleaned. Eeeewww! How I hated that damp cloth. Almost as bad as her spitting onto the corner of her handkerchief to clean a smudge off my face.
To this day I feel guilty if I do not sit down to eat.

January 04, 2012 7:33 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

Pasties should be a whole topic for another day. The men of Cornwall worked in the tin mines or in agriculture. A filling portable lunch was a pastie or pasty - poor man's food - wrapped in pastry, one end would contain meat and veg, the other some stewed fruit. Main course and dessert all in one package.

January 04, 2012 7:43 AM
1521 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 Shandonista said...

Julia - How right you are about the cookbook for sandwiches.  I will be searching the library for one today.
 
My humble suggestion is that thinly-sliced red onion really makes a big contribution to a sandwich.
 
KSS~  Gird your appetite, we have a year of nauseating politics facing us!
 
 

January 04, 2012 7:45 AM
Myself 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Spring Fragrance said...

...and then there was the vegemite sandwich made famous in the song DownUnder from Men at Work.....  " Buying bread from a man in Brussels
He was six-foot-four and full of muscles
I said, "Do you speak-a my language?"
He just smiled and gave me a vegemite sandwich" According to the Urban Dictionary, a vegemite sandwich means something else apart from food.  I can't see how, but maybe I'm just a sandwich short of a picnic  

January 04, 2012 7:54 AM
Myself 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Spring Fragrance said...

Hazel, how did a (cornish) pasty come to spell the same as  the unhealthy pasty complexion?In Asia, we have a similar looking snack called the curry puff, filled with meat in a curry sauce. It used to be that men with a flipped up fringe were said to have a "curry puff" hair...like Elvis

January 04, 2012 8:08 AM
Feet_up 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Thomas Typicalis said...

Nosh Dip @ Noshville on Music Row watching recording execs, politicians, and local yokels do classic NY Deli NashVegas Style reading their Nashville Scene and this time of year the cowboys have swapped their flip flops for custom boots. Manuel's is next door, where the finest jackets in the world have been made and are on display including the iconic Flying Burrito Brothers and Mr. Dylan.

January 04, 2012 8:20 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

Spring Fragrance~ It's all in the pronunciation. Do you remember learning A says a? Pasty as in portable lunch is spoken with a big A, Pasty as in looking unwell is spoken with a little a.

January 04, 2012 8:23 AM
4244 Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 ChefDeb said...

Andy Warhol considered the Ham and Cheese Sandwich to be the ultimate American food. Imagine the variations....which ham, which cheese, which bread, condiments, presentation etc. His preference for parties such as press gatherings was to serve only ham and cheese sandwiches. The Caterer's Rule is 3 bites to the mouth from 7 platters (for cocktail gatherings) and he would have 7 different kinds of ham and cheese sandwiches, some hot, some cold. I always enjoyed doing it.

As far as recipes for sandwiches go, there are so many cookbooks on topic that there is even a website called Sandwich Cookbooks.

A sandwich is my favorite thing to eat. French dip, hot openfaced roast beef or turkey with gravy and potatoes, BLT, grilled cheese (well of course!), PBJ, etc.
For years I cooked dinner at the restaurant and came home to a dinner which had been left for me. I would eat the veg standing up and make the rest into a sandwich and toddle off to my easy chair with it.

I do agree with Hazel's parents about sitting to eat, but having had a restaurant in a boatyard for years, my customers there wanted something they could literally hold in one hand and eat while walking. Cornish pasties were a popular selection! My mother used to say "paysties are for nipples, and pahstties for eating." The staff always remembered the pronunciation after hearing that once from her 85 year old lips.

January 04, 2012 8:34 AM
Me_and_dave 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Andy said...

I'm with Shandonista here -- onion and for me, tomato and maybe cheese make most sandwiches wonderful.  But my favorite would not be French Dip, too soggy, but corned beef (lean), Russian dressing and slaw on really fresh deli rye bread with the wonderful crust (or as it's known now for some obscure reason "Jewish Rye" -- had a bris?  Been bar mitzvah?)

January 04, 2012 8:35 AM
4244 Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 ChefDeb said...

Have always wanted a Baltimore Pit Sandwich but no one is willing to go there with me for that purpose alone.

Also want the sandwiches in Pittsburgh with french fries in the middle.

Also want a Chicago Hot Dog. (I know, its a whole other topic)

There's a bar in Buffalo, N.Y. with a handcarved Roast Beef sandwich I saw on TV that I would make the trip for.

Anyone want to go on a sandwich tour with me?

January 04, 2012 8:37 AM
Feet_up 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Thomas Typicalis said...

CD- Great Post. I like to stand for lunch sometimes and do the Chicago flip if I have on a tie. Just throw it over the shoulder and let the crumbs (and mustard) fall where they may. Leaves one hand free for sending a post to the Eye. Gives me a cheap thrill since I could never juggle very well.

January 04, 2012 8:41 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

Sorry, Spring~ I got that all back to front. The big A is pasty unwell, little a is yummy lunch. The latter is often spelled pastie.
ChefDeb~ Wish I'd  met your Mum.
 

January 04, 2012 8:44 AM
1014 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 karma swim swami said...

Haze: Things I didn't know I didn't know. I have spoken of myself as pAsty-complected for decades (because I always am). I think I picked up the word from reading the books by Alf Wight, er, James Herriott, in high school. At that time my goal in life was to become a veterinarian.

ChefDeb: I thought Andras Warhola so considered Campbell Tomato Soup in the can. But it was just the can, now I realize, that he depicted. If you ever have a chance to see the film "Factory Girl," with Sienna Miller, I really recommend it. It has the best screen portrayal of Andy Warhol that there ever has been and ever will be. It's an unsettling movie, but it is an excellent movie.

January 04, 2012 8:49 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

Spring~ I looked up Vegimite sandwiches in my Dictionary Of Slang and it's far too rude to explain on this page.

January 04, 2012 8:53 AM
4244 Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 ChefDeb said...

TOMMY Thank you! HAZE Careful what you wish for...

January 04, 2012 9:07 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

The collge I attended was close enough for me to travel in daily. The students from far away had to live in the rabbit hutch student accommodation and live on college canteen food, so to supplement my meagre income, I got into sandwich making. I'd do any filling on request next day - and homesick youngsters do have strange tastes.

January 04, 2012 9:54 AM
1521 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 Shandonista said...

Here could be the best sandwich description on film: 
 
www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9tAKLktY0
 
If the Urban Dictionary has slurred the vegemite sandwich, I shudder to think what it would do with Chicago Hot Dog......
 
 

January 04, 2012 9:55 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1 bebe said...

MMMMMMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm........................................

January 04, 2012 9:57 AM
1521 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 Shandonista said...

sorry about that bad link.
 
try:
 
www.youtube.comwatch?v=D9tAKLTktY0
 
 

January 04, 2012 9:59 AM
1521 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 Shandonista said...

oh for heaven's sake, the ineptitude is incredible - my browser won't let me C&P.
 
It's Miracle Max from the Princess Bride
 
www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9tAKLTktY0

January 04, 2012 10:09 AM
P1010179 10photoviewsCom-100First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewHr-1 S. A. J. Johnson said...

All I can say is that almost any sandwich is better toasted. My favorite childhood sandwhich: toasted bread, peanut butter, honey, bananas.My favorite adult sandwhich: caprese sandwhich (toasted bread, fresh tomatoes, mozzerella, and basil with olive oil and black peper). I love french dip, and was hankering for one all last year, but alas, the only time I could get kosher roast beef for a sandwhich, I had no way to make the jus.  Arg. I have been on a sourdough binge since I finally got around to making a starter.  My wife and I are up to our ears in sourdough and the sandwich has been our greatest weapon (well, thatn and bread pudding). Fun topic!

January 04, 2012 10:12 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

KSS~ apologies if I have misled you. The pasty as in appearance of ill-health is spoken like paste as in some kind of glue.

January 04, 2012 10:25 AM
10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Mooseloop said...

"Princess Bride"...one of the best all time films for laughs, double entendres, and pure subtle/and not so - comedy! Shandonista - Thanks for the memory and the revival of the MLT! Billy Crystal is truly a grin maker!

No opinion on the topic today...not so much into wet sandwiches. Even the new Arby's rueben is good to me...toasted on marbled rye with all the right ingredients. Likewise, the Philly cheesesteak at Manuel's Tavern at North AVe. and Highland in Atlanta is a fine treat. At home, deli tavern ham, horseradish sauce, pepperjack cheese, lettuce and tomato, a dill slice or two for lunch.

Mr. P certainly knows his village, here, starting out with food!

January 04, 2012 11:23 AM
Img00274-20110613-1309 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 l marjorie said...

I love a good sandwich.  When I was a sophmore in college (and always hungry) my BFF's gave me a ham and cheese sandwich on rye and a cold beer for my birthday present. I was in heaven.  Do you all know about the Sloppy Joe sandwich in New Jersey? Not the spicey tomato hamburger thing, a real Sloppy Joe is a triple decker sandwich with either turkey or ham, swiss cheese, and coleslaw. The meat and cheese is very thinly sliced. It's a bit of heaven.  Now that I live in the midwest, I have the Italian Beef sandwich which is a Chicago classic.  With hot and sweet peppers, dipped. We are so lucky that a Chicago-style sandwich shop opened up in our neighborhood last summer so now I can get Italian Beef, Chicago-style dog, fried egg sandwich and excellent tater tots whenever I want!  But there are no real New York style deli's around here, so I have to go back East to get a good pastrami sandwich. 
I could go on forever, and now I'm ravenous. I think I'll go get my oatmeal now!

more on the honor roll
January 04, 2012 11:43 AM
10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Rusty said...

That special sandwich, Andy, is exactly as you described.  Castle's Deli in Margate, N. J. made a corn beef on their own "Jewish" rye that was worth a long drive just to savor.  It's been years since I had one so I won't promise they still do.  I don't even know if Castles still exists.
 
I thought I read that the Earl of Sandwich invented this namesake so he could play cards and eat not ride to hounds and eat.  At the speed you travel when fox hunting eating and riding would be a most miraculous feat.  My sandwich would be in the dirt after the first jump even if I approached it at a cantor rather than a gallop.  And I assure you I need both hands on the reins when heading into and over a jump.

January 04, 2012 11:57 AM
4244 Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 ChefDeb said...

I MARJORIE--Here we call the addition of cole slaw & Russian Dressing a New Jersey Reuben!

Yes, lets take a moment and bow our heads in honor of the Pastrami Sandwich. This is a sandwich which I like with mustard and pickles on rye (Brisket sandwiches have to have many pickles as well, but I digress). Locally it is eaten with lettuce tomato cheese & mayo on what is called a "Grinder" roll (hero, hoagy, sub....). This is not a version I care for but in a pinch one can remove the Lettuce & Tomato!

Have fun storming the castle!

Waiting to hear from Stoney, Paolos and Ivan on this topic.

January 04, 2012 12:02 PM
4224 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 RoadYacht said...

Mmmmmm- ice cream sandwich

January 04, 2012 12:07 PM
Img00274-20110613-1309 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 l marjorie said...

CD:The Sloppy Joe is very different from a Rueben.  It's not hot, and it doesn't have corned beef, it's ham and or turkey.  Also the thinly sliced meat and cheese is part of the equation--it makes the texture unique.  Oh, how I wish I could have a New Jersey Sloppy Joe for lunch today! And I will bow my head in honor of the Pastrami Sandwich. I actually invented a sandwich for myself one day. It was pastrami,  sliced deli turkey, swiss cheese and fresh spinach leaves on pumpernickle with mayo.  It was delicious.  I think I have to try to find a local deli that sells pastrami so I can recreate this for myself. The oatmeal just didn't cut it.

January 04, 2012 12:23 PM
4224 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 RoadYacht said...

Mail order pastrami?  A special section in the JP handbook? Hellooooo.....

January 04, 2012 12:30 PM
Img00274-20110613-1309 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 l marjorie said...

Correction, hot pepper cheese, not swiss chese on my pastrami, turkey, spinach on pumpernickle sandwich.  I haven't made it years so I forgot the right cheese.

January 04, 2012 12:31 PM
10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Rusty said...

CD, I thought a Reuben was corn beef, sourkrout and Swiss heated?   When I ordered at the lunch meat counter at Castles Deli it was by ingredients: cornbeef cole slaw and Russian on rye.  Marty made it so thick you almost couldn't get your teeth into it.  Oh, yes, and the dill pickle slices.  Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm doubled.

January 04, 2012 1:09 PM
4244 Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 ChefDeb said...

Yes, yes the classic Reuben is a hot sandwich with corned beef or pastrami (altho Turkey Reubens are showing up on "PC" menues) but the sandwich I was talking about called the "New Jersey Reuben" is a cold sandwich with added cole slaw and Russian Dressing.

January 04, 2012 1:28 PM
10photoviewsCom-100First-comFirst-photo Cassiepants said...

Now I have a hankering for a French dip. It has been my go-to sandwich since I was in high school. Most restaurants can screw up a burger, but won't wreck my favorite sandwich.
 
The last two nights, dinner has been turkey salad sandwiches, to use up the leftovers. Hubby taught me to put chopped sweet pickles in with the turkey and mayo, top with iceberg lettuce, and pile onto super-soft wheat sandwich bread. Absolutely delicious.
 
My favorite cooked sandwich comes from The Pioneer Woman Cooks by Ree Drummond, a blogger I follow. It's basically cubesteak sliced thin, cooked in butter, with loads of onions sliced thin and cooked in butter, toss in a bit of Worcestershire sauce  (how do you say Worcestershire, by the by? I'm pretty sure I butcher it, and I know you lovely folks can help), then serve on butter toasted French rolls that have some of the sauce poured onto the inside of the roll. Then add provolone... Sooooooo yummy.

January 04, 2012 2:01 PM
Stage_2 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 JALOPKIN said...

MISS ANDY ... MISS RUSTY ... MISS DEBORAH :   I am with you all !!!  A Reuben Sandwich is my Favorite, with extra fatty Corn'd Beef, and Kuliakovsky's Genuine Russian Dressing, and a Football-Sized Kosher Dill on the side, with a Large Bowl of Cole Slaw ... Beer so cold it makes your teeth hurt ... and I hate to ad mit it, but a pile of Pom Frits with more Russian Dressing on Top !!! 
 
The kind of thing that will take one thru an afternoon's toils, quite easily ... Good Fuel, and the Old Engine runs well ....... For Dessert, try a small piece of Cheesecake ... or one of Roady's Ice Cream Sandwiches, made with a Favorite Flavor, and Frozen Waffles just out of the Toaster ....... Pistachio for me ...
 
Finish up with a Good Cup of Hot Tea, or Coffee, and satisfaction can be had ... but don't rush the experience .......

January 04, 2012 2:15 PM
Img00274-20110613-1309 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 l marjorie said...

My husband made me his homemade version of an egg McMuffin for lunch:  English muffin toasted and buttered, sliced aged cheddar, a slice of ham (off the bone, not the thin stuff you get at the deli), a hard cooked fried egg.  Put it all together and eat with a glass of milk on the side.  It took care of my pastrami sandwich craving, at least for now.

January 04, 2012 3:12 PM
4244 Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 ChefDeb said...

RY I am with you 100% about the Ice Cream Sandwich. But i don't want some fancy schmancy one with homemade cookies & designer ice cream, no no no, I want one thats been in the freezer long enough for the chocolate cookie to go soft with the vanilla ice cream melted all over the paper. Everyone in the family knows that the cardinal rule of the household is DO NOT EAT THE LAST ICE CREAM SANDWICH.

CASSIE Here in the N.E. we say "wusstersheere," but I notice Nigella Lawson says "Wusster Sauce."

January 04, 2012 3:18 PM
1474 10photoviewsFirst-comFirst-photoHr-1 comfortable1 said...

Completely off topic, but I must say Thank You to this forum!  Several months ago, the topic of discussion was "Who would you make the subject of a documentary?"  I chose my mom and shared a bit of her story (born German in 1925, spent 1935-1948 in Japan, married an American soldier, etc).  You all gave me such positive feedback to her story and got me to thinking more about actually pursuing somehow getting it all down.  Well, this last Christmas, my sister and I got my mom a professional biographer/ghostwriter as her gift (a gift to us, really)!  Both Mom and the biographer arrive here at my home this coming Monday to being a week of in-depth conversations between the two of them.   Research, more interviews with friends from that period, other relatives, and months later....voila, Mom's story in book form!  Had it not been for Peterman's Eye, the wonderfully interesting topics suggested here, and the incredibly giving and thoughtful folks who frequent this space, I would never have embarked on this trip down memory lane with my mother!  My sister, our children, and I thank you all so much!!

January 04, 2012 3:19 PM
10photoviewsCom-100First-comFirst-photo Cassiepants said...

CD, thank you! I have now learned something for this Jan. 4th. On to find a perfect sandwich for today. Or maybe a salad, since I have to fit into a nice dress for my brother's wedding by next Saturday.

January 04, 2012 3:46 PM
Sarah2 10photoviewsFirst-comFirst-photoHr-1 Dash said...

Rusty:  Sorry about the horses.  That was my imagination running away with me after having watched the first season of "Downton Abbey."  They had a great scene where all the rich folk were sitting on their horses before the hunt, enjoying champagne and hors d'ouvres.  (if I spelled that correctly)  While the staff served them.  The sandwich decided to play a walk-on role for me.

January 04, 2012 3:53 PM
Sarah2 10photoviewsFirst-comFirst-photoHr-1 Dash said...

One of the few times I saw my father, he made a sandwich out of peanut butter and bologna.  I was very young then and willing to try anything this strange hero tried.  I found that it tasted quite good.  I wouldn't want to try it now, however.  The bologna was always Oscar Meyer, a thing that rattles my cousins to no end.  My mother was a single parent and always worried about money.  But certain things she felt could not be skimped on.  One of them was Oscar Meyer bologna.  My aunt, a great saver, bought the cheap deli bologna.  So whenever my cousins remember my mother, they rave about the fact that she had the class to buy Oscar Meyer.  It makes me laugh.  Those little things.

January 04, 2012 4:16 PM
Img00274-20110613-1309 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 l marjorie said...

'Cause Oscar Meyer has a way with B-O-L-O-G-N-A

January 04, 2012 4:52 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Carol said...

It's hard to beat a good Reuben..................haven't had a good one for years!           ................Comfortabl1--good for you!  That sounds like a delightful gift and one to be enjoyed for a long, long time by so many.  Excellent!

January 04, 2012 5:23 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-5 George Hall said...

Comfortable1, what a great idea.  My mother died at age 99 a couple of years ago. We talked about ways to preserve her experiences and memories but never thought of a professional biographer. I just love the idea!

January 04, 2012 5:53 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Carol said...

Never tried bologna and peanut butter, but remember fondly (and might should try again) peanut butter, mayo, and dill pickle slices.   Hmmmmmmmmm, maybe tomorrow's lunch.....

January 04, 2012 6:23 PM
Myself 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Spring Fragrance said...

Comfortable1...what a nice encouraging post!    Hazel, KSS, I was still abit confused over the pronounciation of food pasty and texture pasty. I thought it the same as Chefdeb at 8.23 too but seems that is incorrect. So I looked up Forvo's.....  Hazel, if you can just confirm that...its more like food "pesty" and KSS's skin tone is "paste-ty"  (KSS, you need more sunshine ...lol...)   http://www.forvo.com/search/pasty/   BTW, Hazel, do you prounounce past (time) as "pahst" or "pest"? I believe the Americans here would pronounce it as "pest"? I prounounce it as "pahst"     

January 04, 2012 7:06 PM
4244 Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 ChefDeb said...

SPRING I think we pronounce it "pahhst" as opposed to New Zealanders who pronouce "pist." (sorry couldn't resist)

January 04, 2012 7:26 PM
Feet_up 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Thomas Typicalis said...

The good sandwich is not fiction but has found a place in Detective fiction. Edward X. Delaney for instance created by the late Lawrence Sanders. It has been written, "He was not only known for the capture of hatchet-wielding psychopaths but also for his unique sandwich combinations. He experimented with exotic breads and onions and meshed them with imported spicy salamis and other cold cuts. The final product was then spread with thin layers of various trappings. Anything that went well with a rye highball and a dill pickle usually sufficed. His sandwich was ready to consume when it was piled so high that he had to eat it hanging over the kitchen sink." We both have neat freak wives and that makes the adventure daring though for the "dick" I guess a good murder has you working up a whale of an appetite.

January 04, 2012 7:31 PM
Myself 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Spring Fragrance said...

ChefDeb......lol....I suspect the kiwis will pronounce it as pucks...as in chups (fush and chups) and sucks (number after five)   Not sure about Broad Australian (@ Steve Irwin, Paul Hogan..)...think they would be pist about being parse-t

January 04, 2012 7:37 PM
Sarah2 10photoviewsFirst-comFirst-photoHr-1 Dash said...

lmarjorie:  Thanks for the song.  A brief note about pumpernickel.  When I was a starving college student, my best friend and I were down to a loaf of pumpernickel bread and a jar of marmalade.  (I have no idea where these two items came from.)  I had never tasted pumpernickel or marmalade before, so I had the misfortune of combining them.  Believe me when I tell you that they do not go well together.  I can no longer consider eating either one of them.  Probably to my own detriment.

January 04, 2012 7:38 PM
4244 Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 ChefDeb said...

SPRING Having been called "Dib" by every Kiwi I have ever met I beg to disagree!

How has this entire topic passed by without one mention of DAGWOOD? That used to be synonymous (sp) with a great overstuffed sandwich and I fear that the younger generation would not get the reference.

January 04, 2012 8:33 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

Spring~ Definiteley pahst duvet time over here. Nos da everybody. x

January 04, 2012 9:06 PM
Stage_2 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 JALOPKIN said...

CHEFDEB:  Remember, that there is a Monsterous Generation Gap for us to deal with ... Each time someone asks me, "What's a Dagwood " , and I say, Not WHAT  but WHO ... they cock their heads over to one side and stick one ear up, like Nipper (the RCA Victor Dog) and say again, "What ???"
 
We are so far past the Moment that it is sometimes difficult to explain ... But those of us who can, still like to build a Skyscraper Sandwich , to enjoy while watching a Game on TV, or even the Late Show .......
 
I used to wonder if Arthur Lake ever really ate one of his concoctions ..............

January 04, 2012 9:28 PM
Me_and_dave 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Andy said...

My father worked in a deli most of his adult life.  Ah, the sandwiches he made.  He would always make us our lunches and I had kids standing in line to trade with me.  And yet, his favorite and the favorite of most of the deli countermen?  Baloney.

January 04, 2012 9:55 PM
Feet_up 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Thomas Typicalis said...

Dagwood- The poor guy had to even eat leftover mashed potatoes on his sandwich. But he had that hottie, Blondie and the way they got through the last depression was with the love of family and friends and laughing at the circumstances of life. Where's Major Hoople and the zany characters in that Boarding House of his? 

January 04, 2012 10:09 PM
Stage_2 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 JALOPKIN said...

MISS ANDY:  I'm guessing that your Dad work'd in a Kosher Deli ... that being so, he was probably slicing and serving All-Beef Balogna ... Which DOES have a much different and much better taste than regular old Balogna ... Just like Hebrew National Dogs, made without, Snouts, Ears, Eyelids, Foreskins, and other unsundry parts ... and the Flavor is so good that it is Great to fry up a thick slice or two for Breakfast !!!
 
Some things never change .......

January 04, 2012 10:15 PM
M 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Penn said...

I spent a lot of days behind a meat slicer, putting R through the LLM program at USD. Those days were difficult and at the same time the happiest. I finished my shift at the deli and brought home the mistakes of the day....turkey with provolone...roast beef with cheddar...some days were weirder than others....ramen noodles made it to the table before beef tongue.

The car my grandfather gave us broke down on the way to R's final. He walked several blocks to the exam. I continued to make sandwiches and R would graduate. We would get $50 for the weight of our car at the scrap yard.

I wonder how many sandwich shops put people through school...sometimes I think I should go back.

"Tomato with that, Sir?"

January 04, 2012 10:18 PM
1521 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 Shandonista said...

Confortable1~  Your name reminded me of one of the best mispronunciations my daughter ever created:  comfortul.  As in, "momma, let's get comfortul on the sofa and watch "Auntie Mame."  
 
Jalopkin~  Have you been in Iowa rousing up the votes for someone or just a coincidence that you're here now?  Funny that you describe Hebrew National that way as that's just about what I told my daughter in the grocery the other day.....
 
Night, y'all. 

January 04, 2012 10:51 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Carol said...

I hadn't remembered fried bologna in ages!  I wonder if I'd even like it now...altho' I certainly did many years ago.                 Shandonista--don't you just love those little mispronunciations that jog your memory?  And aren't you glad that you didn't correct it?    

January 04, 2012 10:53 PM
Photo 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Peter Lake said...

Ivan, I too believe in the healing power of Hebrew National dogs with or without a bun!

My favorite vote goes to Portillo's Combo Sammie........ Italian Beef, Italian Sausage and sweet peppers. It is a ten napkin sandwich that once you pick it up, you cannot put it with it self destructing on the plate......which is why the gods created the fork!

January 04, 2012 10:55 PM
Photo 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Peter Lake said...

You cannot put it back down ... That is

January 04, 2012 11:00 PM
1014 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 karma swim swami said...

ChefDeb: Before El Bulli, arguably the world's greatest restaurant, in Spain, closed down so that they could rethink themselves culinarily and reinvent themselves to emerge as a new restaurant, it was said that perhaps its greatest innovation was the ice cream parmigiana sandwich.

One might think that wouldn't be too hard to try from grocery store ingredients---you know, prise open the sandwich, sprinkle some dry grated parmesan cheese out of the invariably green cylindrical shakers it comes in, and see what happens.

What is your, er, gut reaction to this?

Speak from the firmament, you food goddess you, and go all oracular.

January 05, 2012 2:12 AM
13091 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 janej78 said...

Bebe, I tried to post this yesterday, but was too late....yes, Ralston goes everywhere with Danny. I love salad, I love bleu cheese and anything close to bleu cheese and I love French dip sandwiches. To quote you, mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.  
 
Cassiepants, when growing up, we always said wooster sauce ...that's how a friend from Maine said it was pronounced. Nowadays I say woostersheer and I think somewhere between that and ChefDeb's version is probably the most common way to say it. I loved wooster sauce sandwiches when I was a kid. ....just liberally pour worcestershire sauce on a piece of white bread and fold it over. I liked mustard sandwiches too. Maybe you can tell I grew up in the south.  
 
Comfortable1, what a wonderful present to yourself and your children. I wish I had pursued something similar with my mom when she was still around. I kept asking her to record herself or write it all down, but realized too late that she needed an audience. It would have been so simple to just sit and listen and do the recording myself. Hiring a biographer/ghost writer is a terric idea. Good for you for even thinking of it.

January 05, 2012 5:33 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1 bebe said...

Good morning JANE.....................Waiting for my tea water..........................good to see you!
 
COMFORTABLE1......................................that is such a wonderful idea....................something you will have forever..................

January 05, 2012 12:03 PM
Walker_gym 10photoviewsCom-100First-comFirst-photoFirst-review Luddite said...

My dad was a meat cutter for 36 years, from 1937 until 1986 (three years off as a WWII combat Master Sergeant in the Marine Corps). His market always had the hardest concrete floors I ever saw. They would have been slippery as the devil but for the sawdust that he cleaned off every night, spread fresh every morning. Many a time I would be eye level with the cuffs of his slacks in our frontroom and marvel at sawdust tucked in the folds. That sawdust was the same, I thought, as the sawdust we used for the furnace in the basement. Sawdust was a part of life I thought. (Embrace The Rust.) On Saturday nights he would bring home the tip trimmings from sirloin steaks he had cut. My Mom would fry them up and make the best steak sandwiches I ever tasted. As a kid the only thing needed was ketchup (red lead) to keep the sirloin tips from falling out from between the one inch thick slices of homemade bread my Mom had made as part of the delivery system for the beef. The next day my sister and I would use the old wooden handled meat grinder  that was fastened to the kitchen table to make hamburger out of the leftover steak trimmings. Sunday night TV (Disneyland) and those burgers. If I shut my eyes real tightly I can smell the sawdust.

Honor Roll


I love a good sandwich.  When I was a sophmore in college (and always hungry) my BFF's gave ...

-l marjorie

Jan. 04, 2012 11:23 AM

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