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The 9/11 Decade

September 11, 2011

I've gone to my farm in Kentucky for the weekend. It's a great place to relax, do a little hard physical labor, and forget about the rest of the world. If you don't have such a place, I highly suggest you get one.

In the meantime, here's something I found for you to read on this Day to Remember.

See you on Monday.

J. Peterman

From: The Wall Street Journal

 

 

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Under Construction: Design Stuff & Member Commenting - Changes Soon.
85 Members’ Opinions
September 11, 2011 12:00 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 lotlot said...

A day of remembrance . . .

We were staying in a comfortable bed and breakfast in Shrewsbury, England.

As usual that day, we had been using our BritRail pass to travel by train here and there, the idea being to go as far as we could, see as much as we could, for our time was, as always, limited.

As usual, we returned to the B&B late in the day -- at once tired from our journey but reinvigorated by what we had seen and done. England was always like that for us.

We went to our room, turned on the TV.

What we saw was at first puzzling. Was it some movie we had never heard of? No, it was footage of the terrible story that had been unfolding back in our home country while we had been out and about enjoying ourselves in our chosen England, though we had not known about it until just now, the story of the sinister attack, the story of the now-gone towers, the story of so many, precious, now-gone lives.

The images would not sink in.

The awfulness of it all was vividly, hauntingly there on the screen; yet, we could not comprehend what was right before our eyes.

Shaken, we sat down.

There was a knock on the door.

The B&B owner was there. He offered his sympathy.

Was there anything he could do for us?

We chatted briefly.

Then he asked if he could bring us a pot of tea.

As always in England, when the soul is troubled, when there is much to be sorted out, the just-right suggestion always seems to come – ah, a pot of tea. Strong and sweet.

Perfect.

Soon the tea was there. He put it down, poured it for us, told us not to hesitate if we needed anything else, again consoled us, told us how sorry he was for us, for our nation. And then he left. But not before reminding us he was just downstairs if we needed any assistance.

With each sip of tea, we slowly absorbed the terrible truth of what was coming through to us on television.

Today at home on this Sept. 11, we made ourselves tea, slowly sipped it and once again watched on television those disturbing, terrible images we first had seen all those years ago in England.

And remembered.

As we have and will each year on 9/11.

For who among us can ever dare forget?

September 11, 2011 2:37 AM
48481 10photoviewsCom-100First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1 idahoproducer said...

I just finished in the studio recording some follow up stuff.

9/11 is very strange to recall. I know what I saw on the television and followed the news voraciously trying to make sense of the deaths of so many people. The problem for me is what I have been able to research and discover. The young folks that did "Loose Change". The explosive experts who know how these buildings come down and were willing to put their asses on the line to prove this was an implosion but got buried and scorned for trying to do the right thing. The scientists who say this was not what it seems it was. And then of course there is building # 7.

As filmmakers, we cannot allow ourselves the luxury of ra ra raing to push that there was an enemy from a foreign country and that they came to our country and were able to make fools of all the CIA, FBI and all the other agencies that pride themselves in being at the center of all that is going on.
As filmmakers, we seek to find the truth no matter how uncomfortable, disgusting and sad it might make us.
We do not believe that this horrific event was as was published. We do not buy the spoon fed version the corporate media is trying to spin. We will not accept the ridiculous version of evidence that any decent forensics experts will dispute.

Today, we reel from the suppression of evidence, the conspiratorial effort of so many who have gone to great lengths to spin a story that can make us give up so much freedom in order to feel safe. Today we shake our heads in sadness for those who have died and for those who are seeking the truth but cannot find it because of a great effort to suppress and destroy every shred of evidence.

Today we recognize that it was probably an inside job by a very evil force that most Americans will remain in apathy about and because of that, we are still on the path of losing even more of our Constitutionally given rights.

Today I make the commitment to never believe anything in the news without making sure that there is evidence to support it.
Today, I threw out my sheeple outfit and put on my American made jeans and decided to be an individual who will always seek to find the truth.

September 11, 2011 3:34 AM
Myself 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Spring Fragrance said...

It was after dinner of course in Singapore when it happened for me, being about 12 hours ahead of NY. I was doing some work in the study when my 12 year old walked in and said I should go have a look at what was going on on the TV, said he wasn't sure if it was real. OMG! I was horrified; it was so incomprehensible. I rang my sister who works in the same industry as I, then rang my immediate superior who was in a pub and probably didnt quite believe me. I then rang the firm's Operation Manager who immediately got a couple of his staff and they headed back to office to check who our counterparty risks were. In a practical sense, we were afraid of the impact it would have on the global financial system. The terror act made sense in a way, it was very clever; Wall Street is a major arterial in the world's monetary blood stream.

In the aftermath, all my industry colleagues and I knew of at least someone who had been affected but by and large, the Equities business was relatively unscathed. But I had spent the first decade of my career trading US treasuries and so was very familiar with Cantor Fitzgerald, one of the 20 primary dealers; they are huge, handling about 1/4 of the daily transactions in US treasuries. They occupied floors 101-105, just above the stricken floors 93-99. All 658 employees, about 2/3 of their workforce, died. I found it very hard to comprehend that personal link

IdahoP - I have previously also seen your comment that 911 is an inside job. Have these conspiracy theories been proven? Who do you think actually did it?

September 11, 2011 6:30 AM
4244 Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 ChefDeb said...

I was supposed to go to the City for a Dr.'s appt and my mother called and said "a plane has crashed into the Twin Towers and I think traffic may be a problem. Maybe you should reschedule." My cable was out. I put on the radio. My son joined me and we sat immobile listening. My daughter was working on the Amistad at Mystic Seaport and called, hysterical. "Josh works on the 102nd floor."

I couldn't process it. We went over to Josh's mother's house and sat around joking and talking about no cell service, was he walking back home to Brooklyn, all kinds of denial scenarios. We did not watch the television. When the phone rang all our hearts stopped.

In the City, my father's office was at Rockefeller Center and they were evacuated as a potential target. He walked the two miles home to check on my mother and tried to go to the site to help but was turned away. Instead he went to St. Vincent's Hospital to help with the wounded. There weren't any. Just an eerie silence as they waited.

It was 2 days before I could give up on Josh. My father, a second generation New York architect, a conservative Brooks Brothers club gentleman never could look downtown again. He had followed the construction of the Towers from the inception and had personally inspected eevry stage of it and kept saying "I do not understand. It is not possible that those buildings would collapse from what happened to them." He died a few months later, days away from his 80th birthday, never having missed a day of work.

I will not be watching television today. I always avert my eyes when footage is shown. I am happy to say that Cantor Fitzgerald has been wonderful to Josh's mother and sister. And its just too damn bad that they have to be. A moment to say Joshua Michael Piver, an almost perfect young man. As were they all.

Bless you all today. Hold your families & friends tight and no matter we think about current anything, God Bless the United States of America. xox

September 11, 2011 7:11 AM
Myself 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Spring Fragrance said...

Oh Deb! Am sorry you were personally affected. Was Josh family or a close friend? I'm really sorry about it

September 11, 2011 7:41 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Julia Masi said...

9/11 was a  Tuesday and I was used to getting up very early on Tuesdays to volunteer at a meal service for the homeless.  I remember thinking that it was going to be a good day.  I had two hours to kill before work and Runaway Bride was on the cable movie channel.  My old apartment has beautiful view of lower Manhattan, so I could see the Towers from my windows. 
 i got to work in Sunset Park, early, and was enjoying the beautiful view of the trees, and of course I could see accross the river to the Twin Toweres.  I was working with a group of kids when the first plane hit.  The kids were completely shocked when they saw what happened.  It was so surreal that I just pulled down the window shadeso and tried to pull them together.
 
At that time, my charity was the only one that did Post Traumatic Stress with children.  We worked survivors   of vilolent attacks, murders and gang violence.  So we were almost immediately farmed out to help everyone else who needed us.
 
I was too busy to understand the number of friends and neighbors that were lost until a few days later.   A few of the guys who worked in the Tueday morning meal service worked for Goldman Sachs. They never made it out of the building.           
 
I lost a large number of friends to 9/11.  Most recently, a riend who a first responder died from  cancer.  
 
I'm not going near Memorial for a while.  Today, I'll be volunteering in the depression clinic of a local hospital.  We already know that it will be a very busy, so I guess its the best use of my time and energy.  

September 11, 2011 7:47 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Julia Masi said...

All weekend long there has been an increased police presence around Manhattan. The entire city is focused on the 9/11 aniversary.  As a New Yorker, I remember things as before 9//11 and post 9/11.   
 
Before 9/11 we had a wonderful hospital called St. Vincent's.  It was the first place I ever volunteered on a regular basis.
 
Now, that hospital is gone,  So many fire houses have closed around the city.  The city just doesn't seem to a strong  safety net as we did before.    

September 11, 2011 8:09 AM
Atticus_1 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Bert said...

I remember having what amounted to an inconsequential morning,  sitting in the lawyer's lounge in the county courthouse,  going over my pretrial notes.  Then I received a text message,  starting out with distress code 911  (later to become bittersweetly  ironic), saying "You need to get over to Judge Tracey's office NOW."   Something was wrong,  her honor was my friend & neighbor,  but she was always the one who always maintained an even keel.   I didn't have far to go,  same floor just down the hall.   Then the television behind her desk showed it all,  America was on a wartime footing,  and we would all be changed forever.   Now the era of innocence is over.  The distances over vast oceans and continents that once insulated us from danger are no longer effective.  The knee-jerk and impulsive decisions that we made  to deal with the problem now seem to have only made matters worse.  Last time I felt this way was when America was trying to disentangle itself from Vietnam,  circa 1975.  The television showed the last helicopters lifting off from the roof of Saigon's American Embassy,  with desperate people being left behind.   At least that time we could see the handwriting on the wall.

September 11, 2011 9:27 AM
Ryan 10photoviewsFirst-comFirst-photo Ryan said...

September 11, 2001, 4:30pm (8:30am EDT) -
At the time, I was deployed aboard the USS Enterprise. We had just completed operations in the Persian Gulf in support of Operation Southern Watch. At this time, we were five months into our deployment. We were steaming South, headed towards South Africa where we were to stop and celebrate the anniversary of their military. It was a much anticipated stop, since we were to be the first carrier to pull into Joahasberg for many years. We had also gone quite a while without a good port call. At the time, we were hours away from the equator, and were in the midst of setting up for the "shellback" initiation of the crew. I was working nights at the time, 7pm to 7am, so I was sleeping at the time.

4:46pm-
Flight 11 hits WTC North

Sometime shortly thereafter-
We were awakened by a call over the ship's 1MC, alerting us that the Captain had something to say. This wasn't out of the ordinary, but this one had an ominous feel to it. Those of us who were sleeping at the time slowly rose in our racks to listen to the Skipper. What followed was the most shocking thing a deployed military unit can hear. The Skipper informed us that our country - our home - was under attack and that specific details were not yet available. People began pouring from their racks, all of the sleep was gone, replaced by a sense of urgency and confusion. People were scrambling into their coveralls and boots, some people took off running to their stations, others gathered around the small TV that occupied a corner of our berthing. CNN was already starting to stream video from New York. We watched in silence.

5:02pm-
Flight 175 hits WTC South. We watch this as knots form in our guts. There were muted whispers going between people, but nobody really had much to say. The loss of life was devastating to us. We had been charged with the defense of our Nation, but where were we? Through the confusion, there was also a sense of despair. We were far away from our own loved ones. Our country was under attack by unknown forces. We were half-way around the world, and the only thing we could do was to watch the events on CNN. It's a grim perspective when you consider that you're currently part of the most powerful mobile force on earth.

Shortly Thereafter-
Most of us took off to our shops. For me, this meant crossing the hanger bay in its entirety. I had never seen it so tense or quiet. People were running every which way on their way to their own shops. I was running myself, not sure why, but driven by a sense of urgency. At some point I noted that the ship was turning. I knew we were headed back to the Gulf. In the shop, everybody was gathered around the TV. We all gathered and watched in horror as the now infamous events unfolded.

5:37pm-
Flight 77 hits the Pentagon. We watched this, and suddenly things became very personal. This was not only an attack on American citizens, it was an attack on the military as well. Military personnel were now among the dead. This act of terrorism was now an act of war.

6:03pm-
Flight 93 crashes as the result of a passenger uprising. For over an hour now, the country has been in chaos. Our home was being attacked and Americans were dying. The Enterprise and her battle group were now steaming North, back towards the Gulf and the Arabian Sea. We were to be the first American forces to respond to the events. While this made us proud, the feeling of being away from our loved ones through all of this was unbearable.

September 12, 2001, 1:20 am-
WTC 7 collapses. It is the final building collapse of the ordeal. In all, 2974 people were dead. We're left without answers, half-way around the globe. Our mission had changed in a single day. The peacetime deployment that we were enjoying was gone. We were humbled by the tragedy, but determined by our sense of duty. We were an extension of our home. A powerful arm that was already within reach of the enemy, and we were prepared to take that enemy on and make them pay.

In the weeks that follow-
We were stuck waiting. We still had no definitive answers. Our communications with home had been cut off due to operational security. We had taken up station in the Arabian sea, and were waiting. Life had become interesting. We had been issued our chemical warfare equipment and had been under order to carry gas masks at all times since 9/11. Having to carry a gas mask is an eerie thing. You never really get used to the fact that you're lugging it around with you. We trained with them all the time prior to 9/11, but now it was for real. In the back of your mind you know that when you're ordered to carry your mask and keep it within reach at all times, things aren't good. As the weeks progressed, we started to take on a good deal of ordinance. If you've never eaten breakfast while sitting next to a JDAM, you haven't really lived. Since the galleys were open areas, ordinance was staged there before going up to the hanger deck. So at this time, it wasn't uncommon for bombs and missiles to be stored next to our tables. We stopped taking on non-essential food and drink at this time too, so our food often times originated from powder and the only drink that we had was desalinated water.

October 7, 2001, 10:15pm-
Our planes had been leaving with ordinance. We knew that something was going to happen soon, but we were still in the dark. That night, we were out watching flight operations when we noticed fire on the horizon. We thought that it might be oil wells, but the fire was moving, and there were many of them. We determined that the fire was actually missiles firing. Our battle group was beginning to fire their Tomahawks. We were now officially at war. Operation Enduring Freedom had begun, and we were the tip of the spear. America wouldn't know about this for another 45 minutes. This was a surprise attack on the Taliban. Our missiles and strike aircraft were hitting Afghanistan with an massive aerial strike. The wait was over. Soon after, we started to watch our aircraft return, this time without ordinance. This wasn't a drill. We were at war.

The feelings were mixed. Most of us had joined during peacetime, and this was our first taste of war. The pace of life changes, and suddenly you realize that everything you do is for real. This wasn't just drilling and training. The planes you were putting into the air were delivering real ordinance against real targets. It's all very surreal.

Over the next weeks-
At this time, our original return date had come and gone, and it had been months since our last port visit. We had been out to sea for a long time. Over three weeks, we flew 700 missions over Afghanistan. Thousands of pounds of ordinance were dropped on Afghanistan compliments of our aircraft. Many of the bombs dropped carried massages from us. "My" bomb proudly stated "Here's some love from Minnesota." At the end of the month, we were relieved by the USS Rosevelt.

We had General Tommy Franks come aboard to officially relieve us and tell us we had done our job. He also told us he carried a message from home, and would hug each and every one of us.

We left the Arabian Sea and began the long trip home. We passed through the Suez canal at night, hoping that the cover of darkness would deter any violent acts against us. Our cruiser was behind us in case we needed her big gun, and our gun mounts were all manned. We made it back to the Med without incident. Made a last stop in Suda Bay, and headed back towards home.

November 9, 2001-
We had Good Morning America come out and visit us as we approached the US Coast. We were the first combat unit to return home after 9/11. It felt good to be so honored. America was cheering us on.

November 10, 2001-
We get our first sight of Virgina, and what a sight it was. We were greeted as heroes. Tugboats and firefighting boats greeted us with sprays of water from the deck nozzles and smaller boats came up with flags waving to see us in to the harbor. I volunteered to man the rails, so in my dress blues, a stood along the edge of the flight deck and the tugs pushed us into the berth. There were thousands and thousands of screaming people on the pier, all wanting to greet us and celebrate our return. We were heroes to these people. It was good to be home, but sadly it was a different home than that which we had left back in April.

September 11, 2011 9:34 AM
Me_and_dave 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Andy said...

I remember the day as a swirl of emotions.  As a sense of the surreal swept over us:  Are we under attack?  Where is my husband?  Where are my children?  What's happening?  Then, as the day wore on and we were doing the mundane: shopping for groceries, finishing the laundry, talking to strangers:  "Did you hear anything else?"  "Did you know they closed the I83?" Questions, questions, fear....no answers.  My God, they struck New York!  New York, the real capital of our country.....at least in our hearts.
 
Though not having a relative or close friend actually, physically in New York or the towers at the time; this was an event that touched us all and left us different.
 
Of course like other terrible events, I remember exactly where I was and what I was doing when I the news came on minutes after the first event, but my most memorable experience at that time was a few days later when someone started a call for a candle lighting in remembrance and in support of those that had fallen, those that were left behind, those that were trying to heal.
 
We were in a neighborhood restaurant/bar, when the owner came around to all the tables offering a candle.  He said that at 7:00, those that wished to were going outside for a moment of silence and prayer.  We weren't obligated to, but if we wanted to, please join.
 
At 7:00 pm we went out to the parking lot of an ordinary strip mall.  There must have been about 50 or 60 people.  The proprietor of the restaurant came around with a lighter and lit our candles for us.  We all stood there with our lit candles, quietly, not a sound, not even from the children......remembering, praying.
 
I don't know how it started, but suddenly this whole diverse group, if you can imagine:  blue collar workers, professionals, housewives, some children.......so many different people; a piece of America that couldn't have been more perfectly assembled if it had been planned; it was that kind of place located in that kind of neighborhood.....started singing "God Bless America". 
 
Even today when I think of that time all these years later, with all of the personal events, some heart rendingly beautiful, some heart rendingly tragic, some poignant, some funny that have passed, as things do in life, this is what will still bring me to tears.  That small segment of America standing on a parking lot with their flickering lights, tears flowing down most faces and hearts bursting with pride singing "God Bless America".

September 11, 2011 10:10 AM
10041_445991248814972_692962064_n Com-100Com-300First-comHr-1 The Giraffe said...

Idaho  -  I am curious.  Who is WE?  Is this YOUR opinion or film makers as a group? 

September 11, 2011 11:07 AM
10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Lynn830 said...

Ten years ago I was sitting in a barber shop here in Arlington waiting to get my hair cut.  A woman stuck her head in the shop and told us to turn on the TV to the news.  We did that just in time to see the second plane come into to the Towers.  And at some point in the morning, a plane slammed into the Pentagon, about five miles from my home.  The terror was not knowing what was going to happen next.  My wife worked at that time at the Reagan Building, across the street from the White House.  She phoned me to say that they had released all workers and wanted my advise whether to stay put or leave.  I told her to "get the hell out of there."  She was too close to a prime target.  I went by car to a spot where I hoped to intercept her, and watched as police prohibited all traffic going east toward Washington.  A van full of men in black suits, wearing sun glasses and ear phones came by so fast that the hair on the back of my neck stood up.  We feared more terrorist activity - a subway attack, a truck bomb elsewhere, who knew what?  All the while, we could see the smoke rising from the Pentagon.  A neighbor later told us that he had been outside when a plane went overhead abnormally low.  Clearly he had seen the attack plane on its final descent.
Two days later I had a phone call from a friend from ministerial school telling me that he had a phone call from the wife of an old boss.  This friend had been a consultant before going into ministry, and the wife told him that the man worked at the World Trade Center, and she feared he was dead.  My friend commented that before we were through, it was likely that most Americans would have but one degree of separation from someone who had died.  He certainly was one.
I was scheduled to be the guest minister at Unity of Fairfax, the largest Unity church in Northern Virginia, on Sunday, September 16th.  The ministers, a married couple, had gone on a trip to Spain, their first trip ever outside the United States.  We were scheduled to have a wonderful guest musician fly in.  The couple got back to the States almost a week late, and the guest musician never made it.  I had decided to preach on the Parable of the Good Samaritan, and had titled my talk, "Who Is Your Neighbor?" which was providential.  Of course, I modified my talk considerably.  They were building a new church building and were meeting in the auditorium of Oakton High School, and had com,bined the normal two services into one.  I arrived extra early and met with the music director to finalize the service, including some selections of music like "God Bless America."  The congregation filed in, and numbered about 350 instead of the usual 250.  Folks were scared and needed some spiritual support.  Early in the service, I asked all those who had lost someone or feared they had lost someone to stand and stay standing.  Three people stood.  I then asked those who knew someone who had lost someone or feared they had lost someone to stand.  There were only three people left seated.  One degree of separation.  Amazing.  I of course had everyone sit and went into prayer, healing prayer.
I had just graduated from Ministerial School and been ordained that June, and was taking some time off still.  Within two weeks, there was a request that I start a church in Arlington (which had no Unity Church) so that there would be a spiritual presence in Arlington for Unity folks.  And I did.  We started the first Sunday in November with a dozen people in someone's living room.
Driving past the Pentagon was scary for a year or more.  No trucks were permitted whatsover, and there were jeeps with recoiless rifles and heavy machine guns to back up the prohibitioin.  They were assisted by Virginia State Troopers.  Eventually those disappeared.
There's a lot of emphasis on New York City, but there was loss here, though much smaller.  There is now a memorial park at the Pentagon, easily accessible by the public.  There is a stainless steel bench for each person who lost his or her life.  The benches either point toward the Pentagon (those on the plane) or away from it (those who died inside the Pentagon).  We all remember the smoke rising in the sky for almost a week.  It was easily visible from my house.
The new section of the Pentagon was completed well ahead of schedule, and you can tell where it is from the outside appearance.  It clearly is newer.  I hope despite the intelligence reports that nothing actually happens today.  The losses a decade ago were too many.  At least we executed Osama bin Laden before the tenth anniversary.  The sad thing is that were are again mired in two endless wars which are tearing the military to pieces.  I know one man who left the military after five deployments to Afghanistan and one to Iraq.  It is too much for a mortal man to bear.  My friend has been wounded five times, has diabetes that was misdiagnosed by the military doctors so that he has neuropathy in his extremities.  He has severe PTSD and is recovering from alcoholism and an opium addiction.  And VA is trying to ignore him.  Shame on them and shame on Congress for its lack of support for veterans.  Unlike Vietnam and earlier wars, there is no draft and few people know a veteran.

September 11, 2011 11:17 AM
1474 10photoviewsFirst-comFirst-photoHr-1 comfortable1 said...



I left home about 8am ten years ago, ready to begin the long drive to our Orangeburg office. One of our employees there had been murdered by her boyfriend several days earlier, leaving a bewildered 3 year old son, an overwhelmed family and a host of grieving friends and co-workers. Her funeral was on 9/11 and I was on my way to her service. I was listening to Capt Herb voice the traffic conditions on 285 when the first news of the first airplane came on WSB. My first reaction, as it always still is when anything happens, was to call Bob. He was at work at Lockheed when I called and we initially talked about how it was probably a very errant small plane with a likely incapacitated pilot. Incredible and incomprehensible new information poured out over the next few hours and Bob and I spent those first hours talking together on the phone.


A little church packed with loved ones and co-workers, huge bouquets of flowers on the altar and even more carried in by mourners, words and music that lifted the heart. With all the unspeakable turmoil that was happening at that very same time in three places northeast of us, all of us in that church were united in glorious song to honor one single life - but we were also fully aware of the other events, so our prayers were also in honor of all the other lives being lost that very day.

I tried to be strong, for her family, for myself, but began to feel the enormity of it all and tears fell as one glorious voice began this spiritual -

Precious Lord, take my hand
Lead me on,
Let me stand
I'm tired, I am weak I am worn
Through the storm, through the night
Lead me on to the light
Take my hand precious Lord, lead me home

When my way grows drear precious Lord linger near
When my life is almost gone
Hear my cry,
Hear my call
Hold my hand lest I fall
Take my hand precious Lord, lead me home

When the darkness appears and the night draws near
And the day is past and gone
At the river I stand
Guide my feet,
Hold my hand
Take my hand precious Lord, lead me home

About three hours after it had begun, the beautiful service ended with everyone standing, clapping and singing this joyful, hopeful song -

Bye and bye, bye and bye, good lord
Bye and bye
Every day will be Sunday
Bye and bye
One day, one day as I's walking along
Every day'll be Sunday
Bye and bye
I thought I heard the angels' song
Every day'll be Sunday
Bye and bye

Bye and bye, bye and bye, good lord
Bye and bye
Every day will be Sunday
Bye and bye
One of these mornings bright and fair
Every day'll be Sunday
Bye and bye
Goin' to take my wings and cleave the air
Bye and bye

All in all, I cannot think of sadder, happier, better, more powerful place to have been on 9/11/2001.

I write this as I'm watching the 9/11 tribute live from New York City. Paul Simon has just started singing The Sound of Silence. Beautiful, appropriate, haunting. Tears begin to fall again.

Bob and I had many years together, wonderful years with many conversations, and I can't remember any of them anymore. But I do remember distinctly, very distinctly, talking with him, at this exact time ten years ago. And on this very sad day, that makes me happy.

May God bless all our loved ones, present and passed.

September 11, 2011 11:35 AM
1-dscn1106-4 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 PARK4 said...

Thank god for film makers, for without them we would stumble through out pathetic lives, blind and too stupid to deserve to live.
 
 
On behalf of myself only, idahoproducer you're sounding like an ass.

September 11, 2011 12:09 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

Ryan~ you didn't pick the most fun day to join us, Welcome, anyway.

September 11, 2011 12:55 PM
293 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 rings90 said...

It was a Tuesday - I was retuning to work at the TV station, after taking a long weekend for a family event. Of course as always I was running late for work, the first reports were that a small Cessna plane had hit tower #1, no pictures were being shown, yet a plane crash into the Tower in NY was a big deal, so I raced out the door & drove the 2 blocks to work. Raced to the control room in time to see the live coverage of the 2nd plane going into the tower. As national news is already on during that time frame, all we could do at the local TV level was sit & watch the horror happen along with the rest of the people.

Our News director & Station Manager were great people, they had our staff trying to work & get news about friends & family who lived in the areas at the same time. We also called the local schools & asked what their policy was going to be. Most school districts were allowing the parents to come & pick up their own children.

I left work at about 4pm, there was nothing anyone could do work wise there never had been coverage of anything like this to make a reference too for anyone nationally or locally. The National newscasts went on for 4 1/2 days before regular programming resumed. Local Newscasts were shortened, soaps sporting events, talks how's were all pre-empted and the only adjustment to make was to run the scrolling of names & news tidbits for the nation...

I went down to my girlfriends bookstore, as my husband at the time called & said he had to work late & would be home by 7, but I didn't want to go home to a lonely house that would be replaying all the footage. The bookstore was pretty empty and Tracy, Leon & I just talked about what happened & how stunned we all were by it.

I think it took a while for the whole nation's numbness to go away & to be able to feel safe again is going take a lot longer than 10 years & a few laws about what to check for when flying.

I will honestly saw I watched 0 of the coverage today, I was appalled by the Commercialization of it by the networks & I refuse to re-watch it just to boost the Sept. ratings. I did see this by Story Corps & it's one of the few tribute Ideas that I can whole heartily support. http://storycorps.org/animation/john-and-joe/

September 11, 2011 12:57 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

I was in and out of my car doing visits to clients. Located only a few minutes apart, so, at first, I really thought this unfolding tale was a radio drama. Anybody remember War Of The Worlds? Where radio listeners were fleeing New York because they thought it was being taken over by little green men from Mars? I was so distressed when it sunk in that this story is real. I lit a big candle in our little village church today. The door has been open so people can come in and think thier own thoughts. The candle has been standing in a wide, shallow bowl of water, so when it burns down, it will do no harm.

September 11, 2011 1:07 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Julia Masi said...

Hazel-War of the Worlds was alot like the hurricane preparation in NYC last month.  9/11 was something completely different.  We were all covered in dust and debris from the explosion.  The color of the sky and way it smelled while the building was burning is unforgetable.  It was like a brief peek into Hell.

September 11, 2011 1:08 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Julia Masi said...

Chef Deb- I'm sorry for your loss.  I know that we all were holding out hope that our friends had excaped into New Jersey or on Liberty or Govornor's Island.  We just didn't want to give up hope that week. 

September 11, 2011 1:36 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Carol said...

All of our memories are dramatic and forever stamped in our minds.  All of us were impacted in some way, shape or form.  It was like being thrust on stage by a maniacal director with the no script....how does this move on?  what are our lines?  Move on it did.  We went through our parts.  And sadly now we recall and remember with tears--but let's not forget Stoney's advice from the other day about grieving....I can't seem to find it, but it was said so well.  

September 11, 2011 2:08 PM
Paolo 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 paolos said...

I have two friends who are brothers that live and
work in NYC.  One was in route to a 9 AM meeting at The Windows on the World
Restaurant at the top of the north tower. We were in the final stages of
planning a new floor for the restaurant. Fortunately for him and not
uncharacteristically, he was running late. 
 
My father, a second generation New York architect, a
conservative Brooks Brothers club gentleman never could look downtown again. He
had followed the construction of the Towers from the inception and had
personally inspected every stage of it and kept saying "I do not understand. It
is not possible that those buildings would collapse from what happened to
them."

 
I find myself in total agreement with your father, ChefDeb. You cannot
change the laws of physics.  I don't understand a mentality that refuses to
question and investigate what happened that day.  To turn a blind eye is not a
tribute to those who lost their lives and gave their lives that day and the days
that followed.
 
 
Ryan, welcome.  Thank you for sharing your journal
and thank you for your service. 

September 11, 2011 2:20 PM
Pecos_tommy 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Tommy Typical said...

Fate is like a strange, unpopular restaurant, filled with odd waiters who bring you things you never asked for and don't always like.  ~Lemony Snicket

Oh Tiny Tim, I must agree with your request- God bless us one every one. We sure need it.

September 11, 2011 2:24 PM
10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Rusty said...

Do you remember where you were when...?  Yes, we all do.  All you have to do is read the entries above.   If we were old enough we remember where we were when the military went to Korea, when JFK was killed, when the 9/11 attacks occured. I was hoping into my car after closing a gate on the farm. The dog and I had had a delightful run in the woods on bridle paths.  I can not begin to tell you my top speed home to turn on the TV.
 
And now, as we remember, instead of disbelief there are tears, prayers, caution, hopefully healing for many, and even thanksgivings.  I hope we have stopped blaming everyone who worships Allah, everyone who enters a Mosque, everyone who wears a turban or veil across the face.  Like the child who for some terrible reason learned to be afraid of water and has overcome it by learning to swim, I hope we have overcome the panic by learning caution but not prejudice, and I also hope that many of innocents againsts whom we so quickly turned can fogive us the manifestation of our fears.  I am proud to be an American!

September 11, 2011 2:39 PM
48481 10photoviewsCom-100First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1 idahoproducer said...

Park4- Of course you would think I am an ass. If you are enjoying a life believing that whatever you see on television is the truth and that the news makes you an aware person, I must be quite a disturbance.
The truth is that there is no way in hell that those buildings could collapse the way they did without a planned implosion. I do have a masters in physics and sorry if it upsets your idea of truth and fact but, physics is physics and there is no amount of news spin that can make a story true if evidence points otherwise.

I do feel I have every right as a filmmaker and as a person who lost her brother there, to question what sanitized version is being given, the facts presented and the lack of evidence, (due to our government removing every single trace of it and shipping it to foreign countries?), since this makes Kennedy's one bullet solution almost believable in comparison.

I believed this community to be a place where one could present what they wanted to express without being called names. Obviously I was wrong and folks like Park4 will decide what is acceptable.

Sorry and I will no longer post here. To most of the villagers, I have enjoyed your posts immensley and will try to get back here from time to time to read your wonderful writings.

To Park4 - Watch something else besides what the corporate television tells you to believe. Go to youtube and watch "Loose Change", type in the search "building # 7" and, try not to show your jealousy, anger and lack of knowledge in such a distasteful way.
As a filmmaker, I do try to seek out truth in everything and yes, without those who take the time, risk and effort to seek the truth, you would not have it available. As a filmmaker I always seek it, as a journalist, I need to find it and, as an American who desires to preserve and uphold the Constitutional rights and integrity of what our forefathers hoped for us, I will continually make the effort.

September 11, 2011 2:43 PM
4244 Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 ChefDeb said...

Spring, Julia, Stoney Paolos, every one...big hug. To all of you, as always, eat hearty with fair winds and safe passage home.

September 11, 2011 3:02 PM
10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Rusty said...

Idaho, I'd like to ask just why I should believe "Loose Change" about "building # &" above any other media I have available?  And  let me add that maybe I have some sourse many others do not.

September 11, 2011 3:04 PM
10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Rusty said...

Sorry.  Hit the "shift" to much.  "building # 7"

September 11, 2011 3:05 PM
1-dscn1106-4 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 PARK4 said...

I have loved reading everyone's experiences, the "where were you when.." stories.   The hurt is still raw, that's for certain.  I don't think that's a bad thing.  How eloquent you are, but how authentic at the same time. 
 
Thank you for putting your stories here, I'm so grateful I know such people as you.
 
paula
 
 

September 11, 2011 3:10 PM
293 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 rings90 said...

Working in a news room - and for the only national network who had cameras on the Empire State Building rather than the Towers, I will say that I saw footage, that very few in the world, has not & will proably never see from that day.   I don't know much about physics & or what temptature steel metls at or for that matter how much fuel, & other explosive devices were loaded into those planes by the terrosists...  You can all say I have stuck my head into the sand, you can all say that I worked in the industry for way too long, or that I am just a midwestern breed naive girl I watch too many special effecs based movies.... 
  What I do know is what I saw & after the 2nd plane hit & the explosion happened, I knew somehow that building was going to collapse.   The uys want me to watch the documentary on how it was an inside job, I refuse to do so, They aren't me, even tho I was states away I saw true horror happening on multiple tv screens & I have no reason to want to rewatch, relive, or beocme a 9/11 comspiracy idealist (as I have my hands full with the JFK conspiracy) .  1 thing I did learn in news - youcan spin anythign to make it look how you wnat it to for any given reason. 

September 11, 2011 3:18 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Carol said...

Idapro---I DO hope you will re-think your decision to withdraw from posting.  Your posts have been insightful and full of life.  The rich life you've lived, your family history......all go into making your posts engaging and much looked forward to.  Today is a dreadful day for you with your memories.  Please, rethink about continuing to visit with us and tell us about your take on things.  

September 11, 2011 3:25 PM
10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Stoney said...


So much for the kumbaya atmosphere I was expecting… a lot of nice stuff though.
Somber day--
When the grim reaper, that international harvester of all without whom life would have no meaning, comes to call, I'd like to make a little deal: under cover of darkness and with quiet shovels and not machines, make my resting place under the playground, better yet, under the ball diamond. In fact second base would be perfect if you know what I mean.
Wrap me in an old canvas sail and maybe a sweet smelling baby blanket, lower me down, cover me up and removing that little bump of fresh looking soil and tamping it down, cover the spot with dust. Aah.

The Giraffe ~
The royal we often causes ripples in the village mill pond.
It is known that hijacked planes crashed into buildings and that the tall ones came down.
What can never be known is why that made so many people happy what might have happened had we reacted differently or not at all.

http://youtu.be/vCbOEZ8c8dM


September 11, 2011 3:45 PM
Photo 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Peter Lake said...

I echo Park4's appreciatiion of those who shared their memories of that fateful day.

I signed up for an early retirement package later that week. I was on the fence until that day.

As for truth seekers, i would wager that there are many Phd Physicists worlwide that do not make films, and yet believe that they seek the truth and don't believe it was yet another 'conspiracy'.

I guess it is a matter of 'who are you going to believe'

Today is a day to remember and mourn the dead and injured, comfort the survivors, and honor those who are risking their lives to keep us safe.... That is my truth for this day....the way i see it.

Everyone who comments here has been " been around the block" a few times and are in their way seekers of the truth...... Most do not see the need to publically self anoint themselves as such.

Just my opinion

September 11, 2011 3:52 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

O, dear, tears before bed-time.
The Royal "We" are not amused.

September 11, 2011 4:25 PM
10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Mooseloop said...

Oh, come on now, people!... Surely we can have a discussion without name-calling!  I believe there is some kind of rule about posting that reminds us not to be "abusive."
 
It is imperative that we feel free to voice differing opinions on all these topics. Producer is entitled to her views as each of us is, also. Do we not comprehend the old sayings, "Live and let live,"   "Different strokes for different folks," and the value in "Agree to disagree"  ??
 
As Carol voiced, it would be a loss for IdahoProducer to stop commenting and sharing her perspectives. She has seen and done much more in living her life than many of us ever will, so may have some experiences to which we cannot relate, but still has the right to speak up as her spirit moves her. Others have gone off on tangents and not been excoriated, so please invite IP to stay.
 
Welcome to Ryan. ... I really appreciated your offering of the military POV, and your experiences!
Likewise, Rings, your journalistic experiences in dealing with the 9/11 events, and Lynn's own heartfelt recounting of his reaction are appreciated.
 
Comfortable1 - Your attendance at that funeral must have been doubly difficult....My sympathy for the family of one who was murdered (as well as all those thousands who were murdered on 9/11, regardless of whether it was just the 4 planes, or a broader conspiracy -- their deaths are ugly reality.) Your commentary left me wondering what happened to that little 3 yr. old boy, and hoping that he has found a loving home.    (You sound as if you drive around Atlanta, mentioning I-285.)

September 11, 2011 4:37 PM
Me_and_dave 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Andy said...

IdahoProducer -- please stay; how else will I broaden my knowledge and look further than my nose?
 
We had a discussion about this once before and I stated then and will state again.  That though I'm not usually a conspiracy theorist; in this case.....well.
 
Agreeing with Mooseloop - varying degrees of ideas are exchanged here amongst varying social strata -- please let it continue.

September 11, 2011 4:45 PM
10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Rusty said...

I do hope you're right, Mooseloop, that we can voice different opinions.  I think it was Idaho's tone conveying we are all idiots that got to Park4.  Surly we can all believe differently and may not always know all the facts, but I don't think there is a member of the village that is an fool or idiot.

September 11, 2011 4:47 PM
48481 10photoviewsCom-100First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1 idahoproducer said...

To those kind civil folks here that have sent me messages to stay, I would love to keep correspondence with you but will no longer come here to this place. Please feel free to join my facebook place where we post with civility. It is here: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1051353539
Yes, my friend P., you are correct. We have secured the funding to film "The village" but I did not join this to use any material from this blog. I really wanted to join a blog like this and share my life away from filmmakers, producers, etc. I really have enjoyed this time spent and promise I will never use anything written here in movie.
I will post a video of the civil war trunks and what was found in them, on youtube as soon as I have time to edit and post it. (takes a while to upload video) Will place a link on my facebook page so you can find youtube video when it is up.
To J. P. - I, of course, will still buy from your catalog as I love your collections and joined this village because of my love for the wonderful items you bring to us. (two of the outfits I bought this year will be used in the movie)
Adios!

September 11, 2011 5:01 PM
Photo 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Peter Lake said...

Living about 55 miles west/southwest of O'Hare Airport, and home to a small planes airport, skies always have some air traffic and the traffic increases exponentially as one drives east. I remember how unsettling it was in the days that followed, when the skies were totally empty. It was just a hint of how fragile so much of what we take for granted really is.....

September 11, 2011 5:08 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Julia Masi said...

Fortunately, it sounds as though this morning's ceremoney was sad but appropriate. 

September 11, 2011 5:09 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Julia Masi said...

Ryan, Welcome and come back tomorrow for a happier topic. 

September 11, 2011 5:16 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

Idahoproducer ~ come and have a nice cup of tea with Auntie Haze, and come back to the Village refreshed. As lotlot mentioned early this morning, a cuppa is the UK answer to all ills. You have been working too hard and too many hours. Not to mention the Bombay Sapphire. Everybody is entitled to a grouchy day. Be back as your informative, entertaining self soon. The daily topics and occasional fights are a one day wonder. What's the point in carrying a bicker over to a discussion on a different topic tomorrow? I think the Village is a Wednesday's child - loving and giving. We don't bear grudges.

September 11, 2011 5:18 PM
Me_and_dave 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Andy said...

Yes, Ryan, welcome, thank you for sharing -- tomorrow we should be back to food; eventually.

September 11, 2011 5:31 PM
Myself 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Spring Fragrance said...

Idahop, I hope you will stay too. Remember that as a film maker you will have audiences who disagree with what you present too. Isin't that what you will like? I personally take the alternative theories as conspiracies - having lived with a psychopathic now ex who revelled in conspiracies has made me as skeptical of them as I am of presented truths. What your post confused me was it appeared to be speaking for everyone. If so park4's comment is very fair - she did not even call you an ass (personal); she only said you were sounding like an ass, and she stressed she was speaking for herself. If you had been here earlier you would know my support for P4 is coming from a strange place. I hope you will stay, all of us benefit from each other
 

September 11, 2011 5:43 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

Thousands of lives snuffed out on what should have been a beautiful fall day.  Regardless of who is ultimately to blame for it, evil was behind it, and the world will never be the same.  I do not point fingers, I do not know "the truth" of how/what/why whatever it may be, but I do know that we cannot let it change our humanity.  We cannot let selfish, angry thoughts become actions.  We cannot let freedoms be stripped.  We must remain calm and carry on.

September 11, 2011 5:52 PM
Photo 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Peter Lake said...

It is one thing to not like a blunt, but accurate, disagreement.... And it was what and how Idaho said that was labelled,( she was not called a name) but to escalate it by saying the disagreement is based on jeleousy (really!) and ignorance and then just up and say she can't post here anymore...after proclaiming herself....over and over to be this uber dilligent seeker of the truth...leaving no stone unturned.....

Well perhaps it would be more comfortable to just be on facebook where all you have to do is 'unfriend' anyone who may dare to disagree... And they just go poof!

The EyE has never been a place where all you do is just speak your mind and not expect feedback or responses. The comments have never been limited to praise and ageement.

If all you want is to hear is 'happy talk'..... You will be disappointed

September 11, 2011 6:02 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 hazel leese said...

nachista~ During WW2, The UK Government printed some iconic posters. One of them said "Keep Calm and Carry On!"
It's duvet time in Wales, Nos Da, dear people. I'm going to make a mug of hot chocolate to take upstairs and listen to the bed-time story on the radio.

September 11, 2011 6:03 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

My "where I was" story:

Today is very much like September 11, 2001.  Gorgeous blue sky, crisp autumn breeze, sunny and warm.  A perfect fall day with so much promise.

Back then my younger sister and I were living acoss the street from our oldest sister and her family.  A little after 7am we heard the phone ring, and like 2 tired people on their day off we ignored it.  A few minutes later our sister was knocking on the front door in her pajamas, she turned on the TV and told us to watch.  We just sat there with the front door wide open, in our pjs, staring at the the tv.  She wanted to know if she should let her kids watch it, what did she tell them, should she let them go to school.

When the inital shock wore off we decided to carry on as normal and answer the kids questions as they came.  We all got dressed and walked her kids to school.  So many parents were there with their kids.  Some were crying and didn't want to go, some were confused, and some seemed oblivious.  It was surreal to see something terrible happening so far away and feeling safe but isolated in our happy little valley community.  My nieces and nephews were quiet, they seemed unsure but walked into school together.

I went home and then went to open my uncle's restaurant for the day.  People would just come in and sit in front of the big tv in silence.  Employees wandered in and didn't know what to do.  We had very few people eat in the restaurant that day, everyone wanted to take the food home and be close to their families.  We closed early in the afternoon and sent everyone home.  Everyone and everything was so quiet on that drive.  I passed more flags than I had ever seen before in my life. 

When I reached my house I was struck with a sickening realization.  2 teenage friends of mine from Ireland had come and spent the summer at my parents home, a couple days earlier I had been saying good bye to them at their departure gate.  They were going to New York to stay with the boy's uncle and see the city for a week.  I had hugged both Jenna and Jason and the last thing I said to them was "Oh and when you get there make your uncle take you to the top of the world trade centers, the view is incredible".  I ran from my truck into the house and dialled Jason's mother in Ireland, the phone was busy.  I sat on the floor with the phone in my lap dialing and dialing for over an hour before I got through.  Cathy seemed incredibly calm as she told me they were safe and had only been hours away from taking the subway to the WTC when the attacks happened.  As I hung up I started shaking and crying, I sat there for a long time trying to compose myself.

Later that night my nieces and nephews came over and we all sat out on the porch in the candle light and just talked with the neighbors passing by or looked at the stars.  We all felt at peace, we didn't know why or how but we knew we were ok and that our country would be ok and that life would go on.

It wasn't until the next day that people began to speculate and be outraged or distraught.  It kind of felt like someone had paused a video tape and then after a while pushed play.  Life resumed.

 There was so much hate, so many calls for retaliation, so much anger and ignorance in the days,
weeks, and months that followed.  That scared me as much as the attacks did.  I understood it but I still feared it, an eye for an eye only leads to a world where no one can see the way.  All I could do was hope and pray and try to be the voice of reason when someone was spewing vialand false recriminations against entire cultures and religions that they knew nothing about.  I was told many times that I wasn't a patriot, that if I loved the "ragheads" so much why didn't I go join them and
blow myself up.  As an american born citizen I have never feared my own country more than I did in the closing months of 2011.  Not just for my own safety but for the safety of everyone living in this country that was "different", for millions of innocent  people all over the world that would suffer because of the acts of a few misguided and angry souls.

We can't live in fear, anger or regret.  I wish that everyone remembers the closeness to home and family that they felt that day and keep that feeling alive, make every day count.


 

September 11, 2011 6:04 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

My "where I was" story:

Today is very much like September 11, 2001.  Gorgeous blue sky, crisp autumn breeze, sunny and warm.  A perfect fall day with so much promise.

Back then my younger sister and I were living acoss the street from our oldest sister and her family.  A little after 7am we heard the phone ring, and like 2 tired people on their day off we ignored it.  A few minutes later our sister was knocking on the front door in her pajamas, she turned on the TV and told us to watch.  We just sat there with the front door wide open, in our pjs, staring at the the tv.  She wanted to know if she should let her kids watch it, what did she tell them, should she let them go to school.

When the inital shock wore off we decided to carry on as normal and answer the kids questions as they came.  We all got dressed and walked her kids to school.  So many parents were there with their kids.  Some were crying and didn't want to go, some were confused, and some seemed oblivious.  It was surreal to see something terrible happening so far away and feeling safe but isolated in our happy little valley community.  My nieces and nephews were quiet, they seemed unsure but walked into school together.

I went home and then went to open my uncle's restaurant for the day.  People would just come in and sit in front of the big tv in silence.  Employees wandered in and didn't know what to do.  We had very few people eat in the restaurant that day, everyone wanted to take the food home and be close to their families.  We closed early in the afternoon and sent everyone home.  Everyone and everything was so quiet on that drive.  I passed more flags than I had ever seen before in my life. 

When I reached my house I was struck with a sickening realization.  2 teenage friends of mine from Ireland had come and spent the summer at my parents home, a couple days earlier I had been saying good bye to them at their departure gate.  They were going to New York to stay with the boy's uncle and see the city for a week.  I had hugged both Jenna and Jason and the last thing I said to them was "Oh and when you get there make your uncle take you to the top of the world trade centers, the view is incredible".  I ran from my truck into the house and dialled Jason's mother in Ireland, the phone was busy.  I sat on the floor with the phone in my lap dialing and dialing for over an hour before I got through.  Cathy seemed incredibly calm as she told me they were safe and had only been hours away from taking the subway to the WTC when the attacks happened.  As I hung up I started shaking and crying, I sat there for a long time trying to compose myself.

Later that night my nieces and nephews came over and we all sat out on the porch in the candle light and just talked with the neighbors passing by or looked at the stars.  We all felt at peace, we didn't know why or how but we knew we were ok and that our country would be ok and that life would go on.

It wasn't until the next day that people began to speculate and be outraged or distraught.  It kind of felt like someone had paused a video tape and then after a while pushed play.  Life resumed.

 There was so much hate, so many calls for retaliation, so much anger and ignorance in the days,
weeks, and months that followed.  That scared me as much as the attacks did.  I understood it but I still feared it, an eye for an eye only leads to a world where no one can see the way.  All I could do was hope and pray and try to be the voice of reason when someone was spewing vialand false recriminations against entire cultures and religions that they knew nothing about.  I was told many times that I wasn't a patriot, that if I loved the "ragheads" so much why didn't I go join them and
blow myself up.  As an american born citizen I have never feared my own country more than I did in the closing months of 2011.  Not just for my own safety but for the safety of everyone living in this country that was "different", for millions of innocent  people all over the world that would suffer because of the acts of a few misguided and angry souls.

We can't live in fear, anger or regret.  I wish that everyone remembers the closeness to home and family that they felt that day and keep that feeling alive, make every day count.


 

September 11, 2011 6:04 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

My "where I was" story:

Today is very much like September 11, 2001.  Gorgeous blue sky, crisp autumn breeze, sunny and warm.  A perfect fall day with so much promise.

Back then my younger sister and I were living acoss the street from our oldest sister and her family.  A little after 7am we heard the phone ring, and like 2 tired people on their day off we ignored it.  A few minutes later our sister was knocking on the front door in her pajamas, she turned on the TV and told us to watch.  We just sat there with the front door wide open, in our pjs, staring at the the tv.  She wanted to know if she should let her kids watch it, what did she tell them, should she let them go to school.

When the inital shock wore off we decided to carry on as normal and answer the kids questions as they came.  We all got dressed and walked her kids to school.  So many parents were there with their kids.  Some were crying and didn't want to go, some were confused, and some seemed oblivious.  It was surreal to see something terrible happening so far away and feeling safe but isolated in our happy little valley community.  My nieces and nephews were quiet, they seemed unsure but walked into school together.

I went home and then went to open my uncle's restaurant for the day.  People would just come in and sit in front of the big tv in silence.  Employees wandered in and didn't know what to do.  We had very few people eat in the restaurant that day, everyone wanted to take the food home and be close to their families.  We closed early in the afternoon and sent everyone home.  Everyone and everything was so quiet on that drive.  I passed more flags than I had ever seen before in my life. 

When I reached my house I was struck with a sickening realization.  2 teenage friends of mine from Ireland had come and spent the summer at my parents home, a couple days earlier I had been saying good bye to them at their departure gate.  They were going to New York to stay with the boy's uncle and see the city for a week.  I had hugged both Jenna and Jason and the last thing I said to them was "Oh and when you get there make your uncle take you to the top of the world trade centers, the view is incredible".  I ran from my truck into the house and dialled Jason's mother in Ireland, the phone was busy.  I sat on the floor with the phone in my lap dialing and dialing for over an hour before I got through.  Cathy seemed incredibly calm as she told me they were safe and had only been hours away from taking the subway to the WTC when the attacks happened.  As I hung up I started shaking and crying, I sat there for a long time trying to compose myself.

Later that night my nieces and nephews came over and we all sat out on the porch in the candle light and just talked with the neighbors passing by or looked at the stars.  We all felt at peace, we didn't know why or how but we knew we were ok and that our country would be ok and that life would go on.

It wasn't until the next day that people began to speculate and be outraged or distraught.  It kind of felt like someone had paused a video tape and then after a while pushed play.  Life resumed.

 There was so much hate, so many calls for retaliation, so much anger and ignorance in the days,
weeks, and months that followed.  That scared me as much as the attacks did.  I understood it but I still feared it, an eye for an eye only leads to a world where no one can see the way.  All I could do was hope and pray and try to be the voice of reason when someone was spewing vialand false recriminations against entire cultures and religions that they knew nothing about.  I was told many times that I wasn't a patriot, that if I loved the "ragheads" so much why didn't I go join them and
blow myself up.  As an american born citizen I have never feared my own country more than I did in the closing months of 2011.  Not just for my own safety but for the safety of everyone living in this country that was "different", for millions of innocent  people all over the world that would suffer because of the acts of a few misguided and angry souls.

We can't live in fear, anger or regret.  I wish that everyone remembers the closeness to home and family that they felt that day and keep that feeling alive, make every day count.


 

September 11, 2011 6:04 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

My "where I was" story:

Today is very much like September 11, 2001.  Gorgeous blue sky, crisp autumn breeze, sunny and warm.  A perfect fall day with so much promise.

Back then my younger sister and I were living acoss the street from our oldest sister and her family.  A little after 7am we heard the phone ring, and like 2 tired people on their day off we ignored it.  A few minutes later our sister was knocking on the front door in her pajamas, she turned on the TV and told us to watch.  We just sat there with the front door wide open, in our pjs, staring at the the tv.  She wanted to know if she should let her kids watch it, what did she tell them, should she let them go to school.

When the inital shock wore off we decided to carry on as normal and answer the kids questions as they came.  We all got dressed and walked her kids to school.  So many parents were there with their kids.  Some were crying and didn't want to go, some were confused, and some seemed oblivious.  It was surreal to see something terrible happening so far away and feeling safe but isolated in our happy little valley community.  My nieces and nephews were quiet, they seemed unsure but walked into school together.

I went home and then went to open my uncle's restaurant for the day.  People would just come in and sit in front of the big tv in silence.  Employees wandered in and didn't know what to do.  We had very few people eat in the restaurant that day, everyone wanted to take the food home and be close to their families.  We closed early in the afternoon and sent everyone home.  Everyone and everything was so quiet on that drive.  I passed more flags than I had ever seen before in my life. 

When I reached my house I was struck with a sickening realization.  2 teenage friends of mine from Ireland had come and spent the summer at my parents home, a couple days earlier I had been saying good bye to them at their departure gate.  They were going to New York to stay with the boy's uncle and see the city for a week.  I had hugged both Jenna and Jason and the last thing I said to them was "Oh and when you get there make your uncle take you to the top of the world trade centers, the view is incredible".  I ran from my truck into the house and dialled Jason's mother in Ireland, the phone was busy.  I sat on the floor with the phone in my lap dialing and dialing for over an hour before I got through.  Cathy seemed incredibly calm as she told me they were safe and had only been hours away from taking the subway to the WTC when the attacks happened.  As I hung up I started shaking and crying, I sat there for a long time trying to compose myself.

Later that night my nieces and nephews came over and we all sat out on the porch in the candle light and just talked with the neighbors passing by or looked at the stars.  We all felt at peace, we didn't know why or how but we knew we were ok and that our country would be ok and that life would go on.

It wasn't until the next day that people began to speculate and be outraged or distraught.  It kind of felt like someone had paused a video tape and then after a while pushed play.  Life resumed.

 There was so much hate, so many calls for retaliation, so much anger and ignorance in the days,
weeks, and months that followed.  That scared me as much as the attacks did.  I understood it but I still feared it, an eye for an eye only leads to a world where no one can see the way.  All I could do was hope and pray and try to be the voice of reason when someone was spewing vialand false recriminations against entire cultures and religions that they knew nothing about.  I was told many times that I wasn't a patriot, that if I loved the "ragheads" so much why didn't I go join them and
blow myself up.  As an american born citizen I have never feared my own country more than I did in the closing months of 2011.  Not just for my own safety but for the safety of everyone living in this country that was "different", for millions of innocent  people all over the world that would suffer because of the acts of a few misguided and angry souls.

We can't live in fear, anger or regret.  I wish that everyone remembers the closeness to home and family that they felt that day and keep that feeling alive, make every day count.


 

September 11, 2011 6:05 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

My "where I was" story:

Today is very much like September 11, 2001.  Gorgeous blue sky, crisp autumn breeze, sunny and warm.  A perfect fall day with so much promise.

Back then my younger sister and I were living acoss the street from our oldest sister and her family.  A little after 7am we heard the phone ring, and like 2 tired people on their day off we ignored it.  A few minutes later our sister was knocking on the front door in her pajamas, she turned on the TV and told us to watch.  We just sat there with the front door wide open, in our pjs, staring at the the tv.  She wanted to know if she should let her kids watch it, what did she tell them, should she let them go to school.

When the inital shock wore off we decided to carry on as normal and answer the kids questions as they came.  We all got dressed and walked her kids to school.  So many parents were there with their kids.  Some were crying and didn't want to go, some were confused, and some seemed oblivious.  It was surreal to see something terrible happening so far away and feeling safe but isolated in our happy little valley community.  My nieces and nephews were quiet, they seemed unsure but walked into school together.

I went home and then went to open my uncle's restaurant for the day.  People would just come in and sit in front of the big tv in silence.  Employees wandered in and didn't know what to do.  We had very few people eat in the restaurant that day, everyone wanted to take the food home and be close to their families.  We closed early in the afternoon and sent everyone home.  Everyone and everything was so quiet on that drive.  I passed more flags than I had ever seen before in my life. 

When I reached my house I was struck with a sickening realization.  2 teenage friends of mine from Ireland had come and spent the summer at my parents home, a couple days earlier I had been saying good bye to them at their departure gate.  They were going to New York to stay with the boy's uncle and see the city for a week.  I had hugged both Jenna and Jason and the last thing I said to them was "Oh and when you get there make your uncle take you to the top of the world trade centers, the view is incredible".  I ran from my truck into the house and dialled Jason's mother in Ireland, the phone was busy.  I sat on the floor with the phone in my lap dialing and dialing for over an hour before I got through.  Cathy seemed incredibly calm as she told me they were safe and had only been hours away from taking the subway to the WTC when the attacks happened.  As I hung up I started shaking and crying, I sat there for a long time trying to compose myself.

Later that night my nieces and nephews came over and we all sat out on the porch in the candle light and just talked with the neighbors passing by or looked at the stars.  We all felt at peace, we didn't know why or how but we knew we were ok and that our country would be ok and that life would go on.

It wasn't until the next day that people began to speculate and be outraged or distraught.  It kind of felt like someone had paused a video tape and then after a while pushed play.  Life resumed.

 There was so much hate, so many calls for retaliation, so much anger and ignorance in the days,
weeks, and months that followed.  That scared me as much as the attacks did.  I understood it but I still feared it, an eye for an eye only leads to a world where no one can see the way.  All I could do was hope and pray and try to be the voice of reason when someone was spewing vialand false recriminations against entire cultures and religions that they knew nothing about.  I was told many times that I wasn't a patriot, that if I loved the "ragheads" so much why didn't I go join them and
blow myself up.  As an american born citizen I have never feared my own country more than I did in the closing months of 2011.  Not just for my own safety but for the safety of everyone living in this country that was "different", for millions of innocent  people all over the world that would suffer because of the acts of a few misguided and angry souls.

We can't live in fear, anger or regret.  I wish that everyone remembers the closeness to home and family that they felt that day and keep that feeling alive, make every day count.


 

September 11, 2011 6:05 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

My "where I was" story:

Today is very much like September 11, 2001.  Gorgeous blue sky, crisp autumn breeze, sunny and warm.  A perfect fall day with so much promise.

Back then my younger sister and I were living acoss the street from our oldest sister and her family.  A little after 7am we heard the phone ring, and like 2 tired people on their day off we ignored it.  A few minutes later our sister was knocking on the front door in her pajamas, she turned on the TV and told us to watch.  We just sat there with the front door wide open, in our pjs, staring at the the tv.  She wanted to know if she should let her kids watch it, what did she tell them, should she let them go to school.

When the inital shock wore off we decided to carry on as normal and answer the kids questions as they came.  We all got dressed and walked her kids to school.  So many parents were there with their kids.  Some were crying and didn't want to go, some were confused, and some seemed oblivious.  It was surreal to see something terrible happening so far away and feeling safe but isolated in our happy little valley community.  My nieces and nephews were quiet, they seemed unsure but walked into school together.

I went home and then went to open my uncle's restaurant for the day.  People would just come in and sit in front of the big tv in silence.  Employees wandered in and didn't know what to do.  We had very few people eat in the restaurant that day, everyone wanted to take the food home and be close to their families.  We closed early in the afternoon and sent everyone home.  Everyone and everything was so quiet on that drive.  I passed more flags than I had ever seen before in my life. 

When I reached my house I was struck with a sickening realization.  2 teenage friends of mine from Ireland had come and spent the summer at my parents home, a couple days earlier I had been saying good bye to them at their departure gate.  They were going to New York to stay with the boy's uncle and see the city for a week.  I had hugged both Jenna and Jason and the last thing I said to them was "Oh and when you get there make your uncle take you to the top of the world trade centers, the view is incredible".  I ran from my truck into the house and dialled Jason's mother in Ireland, the phone was busy.  I sat on the floor with the phone in my lap dialing and dialing for over an hour before I got through.  Cathy seemed incredibly calm as she told me they were safe and had only been hours away from taking the subway to the WTC when the attacks happened.  As I hung up I started shaking and crying, I sat there for a long time trying to compose myself.

Later that night my nieces and nephews came over and we all sat out on the porch in the candle light and just talked with the neighbors passing by or looked at the stars.  We all felt at peace, we didn't know why or how but we knew we were ok and that our country would be ok and that life would go on.

It wasn't until the next day that people began to speculate and be outraged or distraught.  It kind of felt like someone had paused a video tape and then after a while pushed play.  Life resumed.

 There was so much hate, so many calls for retaliation, so much anger and ignorance in the days,
weeks, and months that followed.  That scared me as much as the attacks did.  I understood it but I still feared it, an eye for an eye only leads to a world where no one can see the way.  All I could do was hope and pray and try to be the voice of reason when someone was spewing vialand false recriminations against entire cultures and religions that they knew nothing about.  I was told many times that I wasn't a patriot, that if I loved the "ragheads" so much why didn't I go join them and
blow myself up.  As an american born citizen I have never feared my own country more than I did in the closing months of 2011.  Not just for my own safety but for the safety of everyone living in this country that was "different", for millions of innocent  people all over the world that would suffer because of the acts of a few misguided and angry souls.

We can't live in fear, anger or regret.  I wish that everyone remembers the closeness to home and family that they felt that day and keep that feeling alive, make every day count.


 

September 11, 2011 6:05 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

My "where I was" story:

Today is very much like September 11, 2001.  Gorgeous blue sky, crisp autumn breeze, sunny and warm.  A perfect fall day with so much promise.

Back then my younger sister and I were living acoss the street from our oldest sister and her family.  A little after 7am we heard the phone ring, and like 2 tired people on their day off we ignored it.  A few minutes later our sister was knocking on the front door in her pajamas, she turned on the TV and told us to watch.  We just sat there with the front door wide open, in our pjs, staring at the the tv.  She wanted to know if she should let her kids watch it, what did she tell them, should she let them go to school.

When the inital shock wore off we decided to carry on as normal and answer the kids questions as they came.  We all got dressed and walked her kids to school.  So many parents were there with their kids.  Some were crying and didn't want to go, some were confused, and some seemed oblivious.  It was surreal to see something terrible happening so far away and feeling safe but isolated in our happy little valley community.  My nieces and nephews were quiet, they seemed unsure but walked into school together.

I went home and then went to open my uncle's restaurant for the day.  People would just come in and sit in front of the big tv in silence.  Employees wandered in and didn't know what to do.  We had very few people eat in the restaurant that day, everyone wanted to take the food home and be close to their families.  We closed early in the afternoon and sent everyone home.  Everyone and everything was so quiet on that drive.  I passed more flags than I had ever seen before in my life. 

When I reached my house I was struck with a sickening realization.  2 teenage friends of mine from Ireland had come and spent the summer at my parents home, a couple days earlier I had been saying good bye to them at their departure gate.  They were going to New York to stay with the boy's uncle and see the city for a week.  I had hugged both Jenna and Jason and the last thing I said to them was "Oh and when you get there make your uncle take you to the top of the world trade centers, the view is incredible".  I ran from my truck into the house and dialled Jason's mother in Ireland, the phone was busy.  I sat on the floor with the phone in my lap dialing and dialing for over an hour before I got through.  Cathy seemed incredibly calm as she told me they were safe and had only been hours away from taking the subway to the WTC when the attacks happened.  As I hung up I started shaking and crying, I sat there for a long time trying to compose myself.

Later that night my nieces and nephews came over and we all sat out on the porch in the candle light and just talked with the neighbors passing by or looked at the stars.  We all felt at peace, we didn't know why or how but we knew we were ok and that our country would be ok and that life would go on.

It wasn't until the next day that people began to speculate and be outraged or distraught.  It kind of felt like someone had paused a video tape and then after a while pushed play.  Life resumed.

 There was so much hate, so many calls for retaliation, so much anger and ignorance in the days,
weeks, and months that followed.  That scared me as much as the attacks did.  I understood it but I still feared it, an eye for an eye only leads to a world where no one can see the way.  All I could do was hope and pray and try to be the voice of reason when someone was spewing vialand false recriminations against entire cultures and religions that they knew nothing about.  I was told many times that I wasn't a patriot, that if I loved the "ragheads" so much why didn't I go join them and
blow myself up.  As an american born citizen I have never feared my own country more than I did in the closing months of 2011.  Not just for my own safety but for the safety of everyone living in this country that was "different", for millions of innocent  people all over the world that would suffer because of the acts of a few misguided and angry souls.

We can't live in fear, anger or regret.  I wish that everyone remembers the closeness to home and family that they felt that day and keep that feeling alive, make every day count.


 

September 11, 2011 6:05 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

My "where I was" story:

Today is very much like September 11, 2001.  Gorgeous blue sky, crisp autumn breeze, sunny and warm.  A perfect fall day with so much promise.

Back then my younger sister and I were living acoss the street from our oldest sister and her family.  A little after 7am we heard the phone ring, and like 2 tired people on their day off we ignored it.  A few minutes later our sister was knocking on the front door in her pajamas, she turned on the TV and told us to watch.  We just sat there with the front door wide open, in our pjs, staring at the the tv.  She wanted to know if she should let her kids watch it, what did she tell them, should she let them go to school.

When the inital shock wore off we decided to carry on as normal and answer the kids questions as they came.  We all got dressed and walked her kids to school.  So many parents were there with their kids.  Some were crying and didn't want to go, some were confused, and some seemed oblivious.  It was surreal to see something terrible happening so far away and feeling safe but isolated in our happy little valley community.  My nieces and nephews were quiet, they seemed unsure but walked into school together.

I went home and then went to open my uncle's restaurant for the day.  People would just come in and sit in front of the big tv in silence.  Employees wandered in and didn't know what to do.  We had very few people eat in the restaurant that day, everyone wanted to take the food home and be close to their families.  We closed early in the afternoon and sent everyone home.  Everyone and everything was so quiet on that drive.  I passed more flags than I had ever seen before in my life. 

When I reached my house I was struck with a sickening realization.  2 teenage friends of mine from Ireland had come and spent the summer at my parents home, a couple days earlier I had been saying good bye to them at their departure gate.  They were going to New York to stay with the boy's uncle and see the city for a week.  I had hugged both Jenna and Jason and the last thing I said to them was "Oh and when you get there make your uncle take you to the top of the world trade centers, the view is incredible".  I ran from my truck into the house and dialled Jason's mother in Ireland, the phone was busy.  I sat on the floor with the phone in my lap dialing and dialing for over an hour before I got through.  Cathy seemed incredibly calm as she told me they were safe and had only been hours away from taking the subway to the WTC when the attacks happened.  As I hung up I started shaking and crying, I sat there for a long time trying to compose myself.

Later that night my nieces and nephews came over and we all sat out on the porch in the candle light and just talked with the neighbors passing by or looked at the stars.  We all felt at peace, we didn't know why or how but we knew we were ok and that our country would be ok and that life would go on.

It wasn't until the next day that people began to speculate and be outraged or distraught.  It kind of felt like someone had paused a video tape and then after a while pushed play.  Life resumed.

 There was so much hate, so many calls for retaliation, so much anger and ignorance in the days,
weeks, and months that followed.  That scared me as much as the attacks did.  I understood it but I still feared it, an eye for an eye only leads to a world where no one can see the way.  All I could do was hope and pray and try to be the voice of reason when someone was spewing vialand false recriminations against entire cultures and religions that they knew nothing about.  I was told many times that I wasn't a patriot, that if I loved the "ragheads" so much why didn't I go join them and
blow myself up.  As an american born citizen I have never feared my own country more than I did in the closing months of 2011.  Not just for my own safety but for the safety of everyone living in this country that was "different", for millions of innocent  people all over the world that would suffer because of the acts of a few misguided and angry souls.

We can't live in fear, anger or regret.  I wish that everyone remembers the closeness to home and family that they felt that day and keep that feeling alive, make every day count.


 

September 11, 2011 6:07 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

Ok my computer is broken, OH GREAT AND POWERFUL IT OZ, please erase my redundant posts, I don't know how it happened.   

September 11, 2011 6:08 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

Hazel, I know, it is one of my favorite vintage posters.  A great sentiment indeed.

September 11, 2011 6:17 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

I am also reminded of this post of mine from years ago, regarding what safety means in the post 9/11 world:

I feel about as safe as I've ever felt.  We have never been immune to violence whether it is by our citizens or others who wish us harm. 

When I was 7 we were having a family vacation at my parents condo on the big island of Hawaii.  It was the first Sunday in December and we were getting ready for church.  My dad was sitting out on the lanai watching boats in the harbor.  Before we could leave for church he called us all outside and pointed to the boats, asking us if we knew why they were out there.  He explained that on that very day, 45 years ago, the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor on Oahu.  The boats were patrolling, partly to ensure that someone didn't attack again, but mostly to remind us and to honor those that fell in the attacks.  The rest of that trip my dad spoke more about the war than he ever had before and more than he has since.  He spoke about friends lost, valor, the war effort at home, and atrocities committed in the vain attempt to crush the human spirit.

That's pretty heavy stuff for a little kid to take in, but I never felt "burdened" with the knowledge.  Since then I've always been aware that we can take all the safety measures we want, but someone will always find a way around them.  We have to live and enjoy life inspite of that, or we will be paralyzed by worry. 

Every trip back to Hawaii for me since then included a stop on Oahu (even if its just for 2 hours) so that I can make the pilgrimage out to the USS Arizona Memorial to leave a lei for the fallen. 

Everytime I walk past our home town memorial commemorating the local servicemen from our valley who have fought and died in our countries wars, I stop to find the name of our friend Lance Corporal Michael J. Allen, a Marine who was killed by a suicide car bombing in Falluja.  Does that ruin the rest of my day?  No, it reminds me to live life to the fullest, speak a little more softly, be a little kinder than necessary to everyone I meet, and enjoy my freedom and my life while they are mine to enjoy on this earth.

Remember in reverance but live in joy, it is what they would have wanted.

September 11, 2011 6:29 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

I really wish they had an option to delete your own posts here, it would make hiding the fact that I'm acomplete eejit a little less complicated. 

September 11, 2011 6:29 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

And for Rings...can't we all just debate and respect each other in the morning?  See I didn't say what you didn't want me to say! 

September 11, 2011 6:31 PM
Photo 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Peter Lake said...

Nachista.... Very well said.

The best we can do is to try to be better and remeber that life is good, but have a deeper appreciation of how fragile it may be.

The least we can do is to carry on.

Anything less is just not acceptable and renders all of it meaningless.

I know that sounds like a bunch of cosmic hoohaa....but i'm filled with hoohaa today.

Peace out,.... And give Sir Boyscout my thanks and appreciation, and keep loads for yourself

September 11, 2011 6:33 PM
Photo 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Peter Lake said...

Ryan....welcome, and i salute you too.

September 11, 2011 7:16 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

One of my cousin's daughters is getting married at the end of the month and we are going to a wedding shower for her today, another cousin's daughter found out today that she is finally expecting after 4 years of trying.  I can't think of a more perfect way to celebrate life and the resilience of humankind. Thank you PL, sometimes cheesy cliches are true, I will give him your best.  The day he was medically discharged was one of the most bittersweet of our marriage so far, I'm proud of his service but grateful he will no longer intentionally be placing himself in harms way. Good night everyone.  I hope it is a pleasant, safe and reflective one.

September 11, 2011 7:32 PM
Com-100Com-300First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Gia said...

My office was two blocks from Ground Zero. On that horrible day we rushed to the site, which I cannot begin to describe. In that day, and the days and weeks and months that followed I was a volunteer at Ground Zero, bringing coffee, providing gloves for fireman who were digging with teaspoons in 1200 degree heat. The smoke, the smells, the choking feelings of sorrow were omnipresent and to the sad delusional person who cannot grasp the magnitude of that day, and what really happened, I can only feel pity.

September 11, 2011 7:34 PM
Com-100Com-300First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Gia said...

By the way, Idaho, my company was then and still is a film company in Tribeca New York. And should your delusions find you elsewhere, all the best. 

September 11, 2011 7:39 PM
10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Stoney said...


Just my opinion but when an element of our society sets about accusing unnamed dark and evil forces within it based on their own superior educational attainments or filmmaking credentials then, "probably an inside job," is insufficient, paranoid and just plain lame.
The problem with understanding and explaining the terrorist activities of that day is that they make no sense and no sense can be made of them no matter how we try.
But facts are things that existed that day. Find them and then, you have something to talk about.

September 11, 2011 8:03 PM
Photo 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Peter Lake said...

Stoney...... Exactly. There is usually a huge chasm between the theoretical and what did actually happen. Two big planes loaded with jet fuel were real... As Gia said, the only those who were there that day can know what was real...which was horror beyond imagination

Gia... Be very well. I cannot imagine.......

September 11, 2011 8:09 PM
Com-100Com-300First-comHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Gia said...

To Peter Lake, I read you with avid interest. You have entertained, educated and amused me no end. And I thank you for your very kind words. And to Stoney, very well said.

September 11, 2011 8:13 PM
Bisa-avatar 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1 JaxZ said...

Welcome Ryan. I valued your perspective immensely.

On that September morning my alarm clock went off very early. We'd only been in Maine a month and Pete was still commuting to Los Angeles to work. I drove him to the Portland airport so he could catch the jumpseat (pilots who are going to work can sit on the extra cockpit seats of other airlines as a courtesy) on a flight to Boston, then another from Boston to Los Angeles. We kissed goodbye and he reminded me to wish my mother Happy Birthday for him as the 11th was her day.

I had several errands to run. Two hours later I was in a store and noticed the employees up front gathered around a radio, something you don't see much in the morning. I slowly worked my way towards them then asked what they were listening to. They said a small aircraft had crashed in New York City and as I exclaimed "Oh no!", felt quick sympathy for the plane crew and passengers and anyone hurt on the ground.

I stood there listening as more unfolded and they realized it was a large jet. Most of our military "family" are airline pilots now so sympathy and empathy began to flare into anxiety. I got in my car to head home, about thirty miles away, flipping the radio on as the second plane hit. The moment they announced for certain that it was another large jet I thought "We're under attack." Bu now I was worried about Pete, but in the abstract, thinking all the aviation in those corridors might be in danger and more worried about those on the ground.

Before I reached my exit they were conjecturing about the flights originations. When Boston came up I went numb. When I "came to" I was almost 50 miles past my town and the other reports had me convinced that war had started. And that Pete was on one of those planes.

I didn't know what to do. I turned towards home because there was no where else to go. I didn't cry I just drove and listened. Everything I heard reinforced my certainty that he was gone. I entered our house and it didn't "look" like ours. I sat on the sofa. I got up and walked over to the phone and stared at it. The message light was flashing. I was afraid to push the button.

I pushed it. Pete's voice came out in a rush. "I'm ok, I got bumped, I'm here I'm safe, I'm ok, I'm ok, I'm ok, I got bumped off the flight" Over and over until the machine cut him off. There was a second message asking me to drive down to Boston to get him but I didn't hear it the first time because I was on the floor heaving my insides out. No one ever shows THAT in the movies. Then I had as close to hysterics as I've ever done. Then I played the messages over again. And again. When I could breathe normally again I called a friend and asked if she could drive me to pick him up.

A neighbor (well he lives 6 miles away, but here that's your neighbor) was scheduled to fly flight 11 (Boston to LA) and was bumped by a senior pilot on the night of the 10. You can hear his story on You Tube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cLj4akmncsA ).

In the military we used to say "Life is short and then you die." People thought that was brutal and insensitive. What it really means is the importance of focusing on now. Now is all we have.

September 11, 2011 8:20 PM
1474 10photoviewsFirst-comFirst-photoHr-1 comfortable1 said...

JaxZ - incredible!

September 11, 2011 8:58 PM
Photo 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Peter Lake said...

Gia.... I do not know what to say. Your kind words have me 'tongue tied and dizzy'..... So thank you

JaxZ, you never cease to amaze Sky Pilot.

To all of the inhabitants of this village...peace out

Oh, I almost forgot to mention this..... But on a positive 10 years after (not the rock group Ten Years After), we were in Morris Il last night, a quaint town on the river that still remembers it's roots...there happened to be a special Cruise Night ( i will upload photos for Ivan) going on and there were thousands in the streets of the downtown. Just as the sky turned to Maxfield Parrish shades of skyblue pink and salmon, they shined a light on the huge American Flag that was hanging from a big crane at the end of the street and announced the Playing of our National Anthem.....in rememberance of the trajedy

It was as if someone hit the pause button, and in almost one a continuous wave down the street... Everyone became respectfully silent, turned to face the flag with their hats off and hands placed on their hearts.....just one of the millions of moments that remind me why we are called United States..... Need more moments like this, but under much better circumstances

September 11, 2011 8:58 PM
10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Stoney said...


JaxZ ~
We had an old neighbor, not a religious man, who had a pet phrase that he called on when somebody had dodged a bullet so-to-speak:
être né de nouveau… to be born again.
How's it feel?

Gia ~
We spent quite a lot of time down on Greenwich and Chambers when our daughter and her husband lived there… Ground .75 you might say.
And thank you.

September 11, 2011 9:16 PM
10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Stoney said...


Need a little chuckle? Imagine John Peterman trying to decide his HR honoree.
Good luck to you Bucko.

September 11, 2011 9:21 PM
Bisa-avatar 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1 JaxZ said...

Gia, I agree with everyone, I'm grateful. All I could think when I read your post was that I pray God wipes your dreams at night concerning that time. I relive mine in my sleep.

Stoney, funny, I almost said that. Although it was my Mother's birthday I sometimes think of it as exactly that for Pete and myself.

It feels incredible.

September 11, 2011 9:22 PM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1 bebe said...

IDAHO.............I believe that the uncomfortableness comes from you pimping the "Loose Change" video ( I think the parody video is called "scattered coins") on a day that a tribute to those who lost loved ones & to the ones lost. You are not clueless, you knew this would cause controversy. We all have things we believe in & we may bring them up knowing that if someone is interested they can PM us. What 99% of us DON'T do is beat people over the head w/ it; for all intents & purposes making this their personal blog site. It is no one's blog site. That is why I always smile when Kentucky Curmudgeon posts the link to his blog & says, "I want to pimp my blog." He leaves it OPEN to us to go to his site or not go.
 
On today of all days you showed really poor timing & exquistely bad taste. This is not the day to put out political views. If that is all you have then save it. I will be frank & say that many of your stories seem contrived. After looking at your profile I see that you listed yourself as having been a chef at some very impressive places, BUT then you have asked several times for information on how to dea w/ really simple ingredients..................hhhhmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm............ you make commercials & other small fare ( not that I'm knocking it, you probably make a zilliuon more dollars than I do!),  but a budding Scorcese you are not. You say you are making a movie about "The Village"...................I will keep checking the multiplexes. You also called yourself a journalist today. You can't just claim a profession that people have spent their lives on because you feel like it. I count on the people here to be truthful and not fudge the big details of their lives. we are not out to impress. As someone whose husband is in academia I do know that one is NOT a physicist until one has a PhD, not just a masters.
 
I also don't believe that you are leaving the site because PARK rightly called you out, I believe there are other reasons, but not that..................
 
You & your friends may be correct & God help us if that is the case. This just wasn't the day to put it out there. And you knew that.................

September 11, 2011 9:28 PM
004 10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1 korthal said...

On the morning of 9/11 I got up in Ocean City, turned on the coffee and the TV.
I was supposed to go to a sales meeting at the Ritz Carlton in Tysons Corner, Va.
The live picture was the World Trade Center, New York, on fire and then all of a sudden out of the sky on the left of the screen came a plane. Surely it wasn't also going to crash into one of the buildings.
It had to be just flying by.
Then right there before my eyes it flew into the building. Then the Pentagon, Then Pa.
This was madness and I never left the couch that day.
I can't watch the pictures again.
 

September 11, 2011 10:17 PM
10photoviews10videoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-videoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Stoney said...


Bebe ~

Is it just me or is it downright comical that we are to believe that dark and creepy men in government and or business who can't find their asses in the dark without an assistant deputy director can pull off incredibly complex and precise feats of planning and execution and keep it all secret?
You did good!

September 11, 2011 10:40 PM
M 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoFirst-reviewHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 Penn said...

"I wish that everyone remembers the closeness to home and family that they felt that day and keep that feeling alive, make every day count." Nachista, I won't even attempt to say it better.


[And to D...in reflection; the remembrance of that Seattle day.]

September 11, 2011 11:41 PM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

On conspiracy theorists, they aren't always wrong, but they are seldom fully in the right either.  For a moving film about what happens when a country fails in protecting the rights of its accused citizens, please watch the Robert Redford film The Conspirator, it really is a tremendous film about the shocking true story of a gross miscarriage of justice following the assassination of Lincoln.

September 12, 2011 12:00 AM
10041_445991248814972_692962064_n Com-100Com-300First-comHr-1 The Giraffe said...

Now this day is coming to an end and an interesting day it has been, filled with emotion and love.  In many ways a difficult day for many, myself included.  We got thru it!
 
Ryan - Welcome, so enjoyed your posts.  Hope you will stick around.
 
Bebe - thank you!

September 12, 2011 9:44 AM
Com-100Com-300Com-500First-comHr-1Hr-5 George Hall said...

JaxZ and all of you~ We never know how events affect people we've come to love and value until we hear. How awful your experience must have been. Sometimes its haed to find the good in bad things but I do believe that "...all things work together for good to all who are called after HIs purpose."
 
I recently read an example of salt...made of sodium  and chloride; each a poison but together an essential ingredient for health.

September 12, 2011 11:20 AM
Walker_gym 10photoviewsCom-100First-comFirst-photoFirst-review Luddite said...

9-11-01, and the first anniversary of that date share significant moments in my life. The Seattle day was shared with the great 'heart' of my life, as was the anniversary. I watched Casablanca last night, and heard both of Bogart's watershed comments at the end of the show. He and Claude Rains walked off into the silence of the fog, together.

September 12, 2011 11:27 AM
Walker_gym 10photoviewsCom-100First-comFirst-photoFirst-review Luddite said...

... it doesn't take much to see that the problems of three little people don't amount to a hill of beans ...
 
Louis, I think this is the beginning of ...

September 12, 2011 11:49 AM
Bwme 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 nachista said...

Hmmmm I wonder if someone here is an "Aspy", they seem to fit the profile of the departed Eloise (I think that was the asperbergers person).  That does seem to be a very impressive resume.

September 12, 2011 3:05 PM
Beth_1209 10photoviewsCom-100First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-5 EADutton said...

Ten years ago yesterday was the last time I ever watched Good Morning America....I still to this day will not watch Diane Swayer.  She does not do well in emergencies and often gets her facts (even HER location) wrong. 
 
My middle son was home from school that day and was in my bedroom wathcing TV with my then 2 year-old grandson.  They saw the people jumping out of the Towers....before the news realized what was happening.  This son is now an MP in the US Army.  He has served for five years and served two tours in Iraq...so far.  My grandson is now in the 7th grade and is in Junior ROTC. His aspries to attend West Point.
 
No, this war on terror will not have a definitve end any time soon.  It has become a part of our existence.  It has become our way of life.  It has become our reality. 
 
LUDDITE ~ I watched the same showing of Casablanca last night. It is one of my favorite movies...one of the things my late husband and I enjoyed. 

September 12, 2011 5:15 PM
1-dscn1106-4 10photoviewsCom-100Com-300Com-500First-comFirst-photoHr-1Hr-10Hr-5 PARK4 said...

HI 5 Bebe.  You said it well.  I know you're thinking it, but often you hold back with a restraint I admire, but you didn't this time, and I'm glad.  .........................................  It's the day after, and to this entire group, this Village, I want to thank you again for your stories and recollections and sharing them as you did, with heart and soul  and mind -- a special group you are.  Very special, indeed.........................................................That said, I am so glad the weekend's done.  Aren't you?  It was in turn a day to smile (a grandson's birthday party), a time to cry for our country, a day to celebrate a football win Go Bears!, and a day to mourn again the death of my father who was born on 9/11 but in 1922 - oh exhausting day!................... Last night when I went to bed, all in all I felt like my body'd been beat inside and out, and I watched "Forrest Gump" thinking it would make me feel better, but by the time he lost Bubba, I was in tears.............................Luddy, I should have watched "Casablanca" where at least I knew that Claude Rains would make me smile when he was "shocked, I tell you, shocked."...............................................Ah well......it's 9/12, and we here we all are as usual, and I'm so glad.  " Once more into the breach," right?     

Honor Roll



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Psychopaths use charm and manipulation to achieve success in the workplace, according to a US study.

 

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